Roku Device Features, Settings & Updates

Help configuring Roku device settings, using Roku OS features such as screen mirroring, adjusting display type and audio settings, using Guest Mode, and assistance with software updates.
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Level 7

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

Horror movie ads for "Us" and "Purge" on the home screen have almost traumatized my little kids trying to watch PBS Kids. At least have PG ad option!
Level 7

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

I respect your viewpoint, but the day I bought our first Roku tv, 20 minutes later my young children come telling me bad stuff is on the tv, there was a huge ad with a woman in skimpy lingerie laying on a bed with her breast about to fall out, smoking a cigarette and holding a liquor bottle with drug paraphanelia in the background! No thanks Roku! Ever since day 1, I have employed dns level adblocking. 

Highlighted
Level 7

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

They make money from selling these Televisions now, so they can afford to turn that Spam off the Home Screen now.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Level 7

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

So why not raise **bleep** about it? If you let it happen then you're the issue.

0 Kudos
Highlighted

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

Ken1437, I forgot I even had the question on here it's been so long ago. However, is it necessary to respond in such a manner? If you have issues then perhaps you need to address them outside of Roku not in here. You have a lovely day in any case. I hope and pray you get the help you need. 

Highlighted

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

Thanks for the tip Mr. Eyeno

As of Feb 2020, this still works. Not only did it relieve me of those intrusive and possibly offensive ads, the DNS approach in my main router also helped with other sites. I don't see as many ads on websites, including Fakebook.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Anonymous
Not applicable

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

It's a shame we don't have at least the option to turn off the menu ads on the Roku tcl tv. If the advertisements were strictly for streaming apps and not news and Hollywood gossip apps then I wouldn't complain.

[post edited]

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Level 7

Disabling/Reporting Offensive Ads

I find the following ad offensive.  I don't think me or my family needs to be subjected to viewing things like this in our home.

How to disable?

IMG_20200312_100159.jpg

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Level 7

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

They should at least make the UI scale properly to take up the wasted space when no ads can be loaded.

They could never make the Roku not work while blocking Ads, since it would be a gigantic PR nightmare for them. So they might as well make people who block the ads happier.

If they were smart they would create a paid "no ads" add-on. This should be a reasonable one time fee that removes ads from the home screen permanently. It would be tied to your Roku account, where your devices are registered. They would have a limit to say 5 devices per account so people couldn't abuse it.

Then also create another tier that removes ads from their channel, any channels that use their ad framework, and make this a monthly subscription. This should also include the home screen ad-on.

If reasonably priced they could make just as much money as they did on the advertising, all while making their customers happy.

If it becomes popular enough it would scale past the ad revenue itself. And if no one buys it, they still have the ad revenue in-tact / no change. So really it is a win-win for them and the customers.

Why would a company do that though.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Level 8

Re: How do I disable ads on my homescreen?

Someone else mentioned this but it bears repeating. Get a Pi-Hole.

Pi-Hole is software that runs on a Raspberry Pi. A Raspberry Pi is a tiny computer ($50 on Amazon) that takes 5 minutes to put together and becomes your DNS (domain name server), taking that job away from your internet service provider (ISP).

A DNS server takes plain English web site names you've typed and translates them to internet addresses. For example, the actual address of Roku's computers is 99.84.206.54 (there's more but that's one of them) but you're not going to remember that. So you just type roku.com into your browser and when you hit return, your request is connected to a DNS server which translates roku.com to 99.84.206.54.

When you first set up the internet in your home, you're automatically connected to your ISP's DNS servers. You can easily find out what they are but I won't get into that here, just ask Mr. Google, he'll tell 'ya how. So think about it, your ISP has an interest in allowing ads to get to your computer. In particular, if you mis-type a web site, usually you'll get your ISP's page telling you you took a wrong turn and showing you a million dollars worth of ads. A PI-Hole takes that job away from your ISP and brings it into your house. Then, the PI-Hole periodically goes out to web sites that track every ad server in the world and downloads the black lists. This all happens silently for you but from that point on, the PI-Hole blocks ads from getting to your computing devices (computers, phones, Roku's, game machines, etc.). Continuing on to the software setup:

After you snap the hardware together, you go to the Pi-Hole web site (pi-hole.net) and it explains how to install the software. It took me 20 minutes having no experience doing this before. There are VERY detailed instructions as it's open source and therefore a lot of people have edited the instructions over a couple years, so it's amazingly clear on what to do.

After setup, you can either set this to be your DNS server on each device in your house (ask Mr. Google how to do it for your operating system) or even easier and better, get into your router and set the Pi-Hole as your first DNS server. Again, easy to get into your router but you'll need to ask Mr. Google for the manual for your specific router if you don't have it. The manual contains the default password for getting in and that works 95% of the time. It is NOT your WiFi password. If the password in the manual doesn't work, it's probably because your ISP password protects their routers so if you're using their router in your house, you'll need to call them and ask what the password is. I've never had them refuse me but they will warn you that you'd better know what your doing. What you're doing is super-simple and easily reversible so don't worry. As an aside, if you're paying a monthly fee for their router, go buy yourself a new one (their support page will tell you which are compatible with their service) and give them back theirs. You'll pay for your new router in short order and every month after that the fee goes onto YOUR pocket.

Once your Pi-Hole is operational, you won't see ads on any device in your home and if you connected it to your router, any visitors in your home won't see ads on their devices while connected to your (usually WiFi) network. You'll see blank spaces on web pages and a lot of "can't reach server" errors in the middle of things you're reading. That's where the ad was supposed to go (it's a good error). You're not missing anything in the article you're reading, just the ads.

Good luck, have fun and if you have any questions, just hit reply.