Playback Issues - Audio/Video & Power

Help with audio & video playback issues, TV display type recognition & compatibility, HDCP messages, troubleshooting playback errors, advertisements, and resolving power issues.
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Level 12

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"twbranch" wrote:
I never had a problem with that until I bought a Roku TV. The streaming stick which is about 4 yo doesn't seem to have that problem. It is weird to me. Same channel two different "ROKU"s. 

Which to me suggests dynamic ad insertion.
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"DubTaylor" wrote:

 You can do like many of the rest of us do - uninstall 'Ad Supported' channels and do not ever install one again.

Many channels/apps I watch are ad free (Netflix, HBO/Showtime, etc...)
But there are some apps I just have no way around it. Comedy Central, AMC, FX... or live sporting events on NBC Sports, FOX Sports, etc...
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"jeffrok" wrote:
To the OP,

See if your TV supports some sort of "smart volume" setting, where it normalizes volume a little. As others have said, there are regulations for cable and antenna TV against super loud commercials, but streaming boxes don't follow that rule (yet).

Thank you for your suggestion. I have those settings on my speakers. Unfortunately it doesn't work well and actually does more harm than good (this may be entirely dependent on the brand and unfortunately mine doesn't do a good job).
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Level 10

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

Basically the advent of digital audio and the prevalence of HDMI has ruined what was some quite good solutions to the uneven audio that exists in the AV world.

I bought a couple of Terk volume stabilizers a few years ago for about $25.00 each. That device is for analog audio (normal stereo with adapter or red/white RCA type cables carrying no better than Dolby 2.1) and no longer seems readily available. Even when I checked a couple of years ago they were selling for over $75.00. 

They work well and really do stabilize the volume. Clearly they do decrease dynamic range but the Terk ones keep almost all the quality of the music and the lack of sudden blaring audio and the ability to keep spoken audio (dialog) understandable without being overwhelmed by background sound or music is a trade off I am more than willing to endure.

I have tested several HDMI devices that say they do the same type of thing and even several top end receivers and not one is even close to being good enough to warrant daily use.

Fortunately my old ears do not need anything beyond Dolby 2.1 and all my devices do a good job of down-mixing all the audio formats to 2.1 so my setup is good for me. I have no idea what will happen when standards evolve past the abilities of my setup to produce 2.1 or my Terk adapters fail but hopefully by then my ears will be so bad that the excessive volume will seem like a stage whisper.
Two Roku Ultras, three Roku 3s and a Roku 1
"Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside." Mark Twain
Van Roy's Law: An unbreakable toy is useful for breaking other toys.
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"mikebdoss" wrote:
More information regarding the CALM Act: https://www.fcc.gov/media/policy/loud-commercials

In short, it only applies to commercials in broadcast television and pay television (cable/sat). It doesn't apply to streaming. 

Considering streaming Roku apps from major cable and network TV providers (NBC Sports, Comedy Central, etc.) need a legit cable subscription login to watch, wouldn't that be considered "pay television?" 
Not asking you specifically, just a thought. Thank you for that link, too.
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"GP2Engine" wrote:
"mikebdoss" wrote:
More information regarding the CALM Act: https://www.fcc.gov/media/policy/loud-commercials

In short, it only applies to commercials in broadcast television and pay television (cable/sat). It doesn't apply to streaming. 

Considering streaming Roku apps from major cable and network TV providers (NBC Sports, Comedy Central, etc.) need a legit cable subscription login to watch, wouldn't that be considered "pay television?" 
Not asking you specifically, just a thought. Thank you for that link, too.

As he (and myself) implied, it is in the provider's best interest to bend the rules as much as possible. They have nothing to gain by following the letter of the law, let alone spirit; and complaints are just whispers in a storm.

If I were honest, as much as I would not like ads to be blaring, getting the government involved is a Bad Idea.
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"dfgsrzwer" wrote:
"GP2Engine" wrote:
"mikebdoss" wrote:
More information regarding the CALM Act: https://www.fcc.gov/media/policy/loud-commercials

In short, it only applies to commercials in broadcast television and pay television (cable/sat). It doesn't apply to streaming. 

Considering streaming Roku apps from major cable and network TV providers (NBC Sports, Comedy Central, etc.) need a legit cable subscription login to watch, wouldn't that be considered "pay television?" 
Not asking you specifically, just a thought. Thank you for that link, too.

As he (and myself) implied, it is in the provider's best interest to bend the rules as much as possible. They have nothing to gain by following the letter of the law, let alone spirit; and complaints are just whispers in a storm.

If I were honest, as much as I would not like ads to be blaring, getting the government involved is a Bad Idea.

If there is something to benefit from it, then yes it's in the provider's best interest to bend rules as much as possible... but we're just talking about simple volume control here and nothing else. What are providers benefiting by blasting their volume in a commercial?
Also... the government is already involved in this anyway with the CALM act that has been in effect for years now. Even if providers "bend the rules" as you say, it still restricts them from going overboard.
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

I don't believe the government should have gotten involved in the first place, and neither do those that bend the rules (or outright break them; it's very hard to prove non-compliance).

What do they have gain? Just a "for instance": they can charge more for ads. A product manufacturer (or ad company) would be more willing to advertise with someone that allows them free reign.
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Level 11

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"dfgsrzwer" wrote:
I don't believe the government should have gotten involved in the first place, and neither do those that bend the rules (or outright break them; it's very hard to prove non-compliance).

What do they have gain? Just a "for instance": they can charge more for ads. A product manufacturer (or ad company) would be more willing to advertise with someone that allows them free reign.

In the past, I've boycotted companies with horrible commercials, and this has extended to those that annoy me due to shrillness/loudness. There's a lot to lose for companies that annoy. That said, it's tough to directly express the annoyance directly to the company, meaning they'd never know I hate them for loud commercials. I'm perfectly happy with the FCC limiting annoyances in broadcasting, just like they do for all the airwaves. 
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Level 9

Re: Uneven volume. Anyone else annoyed by it?

"mikebdoss" wrote:
I'm perfectly happy with the FCC limiting annoyances in broadcasting, just like they do for all the airwaves. 

It's a "feel good" law. The government passes a law that is almost impossible to enforce, and wastes time and money doing so. The only reason it passed was because it "sounded good". And there are no standard penalities if by chance someone is caught.

By the way, it was Congress that forced the FCC to "enforce" it; they also weren't happy about it.
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