Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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Humpert5C
Level 7

router compatibility

On Roku's compare page it shows the 3800R as having a 802.11ac dual-band but has no check-mark next to b/g/n. I just want to double check that it is backwards compatible with my NetGear dual band b/g/n router. Also will it work on either the 2.4ghz or 5ghz channel?
Thanks.

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7 Replies
jontalk
Level 7

Re: router compatibility

While I can't say definitively since I own a Roku 3, most devices today support dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n and some support AC. So I think it's fair to say its likely the Roku stick does as well. The fastest band now is the 5 gHz ac band. Hope that helps
Roku 3 - Power User (film maker)
Mill Valley, CA

Jonathan
LG OLED55B7A, Roku 3, Marantz SR-6005, Panasonic Blu Ray, Definitive Studio Monitor 450 (L/R), Definitive LCR 2000 (center), Definitive 10" sub-woofer, Definitive surrounds.
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ucinn
Level 7

Re: router compatibility

They are all backwards compatable
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Humpert5C
Level 7

Re: router compatibility

Thanks. I assumed it's backwards compatible but seeing no check marks on the compare page made me wonder.
Does it work on both channels? I was planning on getting three 3800R and using them on the 5ghz channel, but one tv is kind of far and I read that the 2.4 channel is better in those situations.
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ucinn
Level 7

Re: router compatibility

2.4 is better if a long distance from the router. I got range extenders so I could run 5ghz for all my TV's and I use the 2.4 for the phones and computers since I rarely if ever stream on them. You lose speed with the extenders, but even with the loss, it's still a quicker stream than the 2.4
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Humpert5C
Level 7

Re: router compatibility

Would the better receiver on the Stick+ (3810R) work like a range extender? It says it has advanced wireless that offers up to 4x range. I wasn't consider the Stick+ since I'm not using 4k.
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atc98092
Level 13

Re: router compatibility

"Humpert5C" wrote:
Would the better receiver on the Stick+ (3810R) work like a range extender? It says it has advanced wireless that offers up to 4x range. I wasn't consider the Stick+ since I'm not using 4k.

To my understanding, the Stick Plus just has a better antenna, actually part of the power cord. This improves wireless performance. I'm unsure if the wireless radio itself is any different. Not saying it's the same, I just don't know. But my version of the Stick (2016 black) works quite well in every hotel I've used it at, as well on my home wireless. I've used both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz connections, and 5 GHz certainly does a better job if available. 
.
Any device that supports 802.11AC will be able to use 5 GHz. You can look at this chart and see that every Roku that supports AC also supports A/B/G/N and both radio bands. 
Dan
Nvidia Shield, Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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Re: router compatibility

"ucinn" wrote:
2.4 is better if a long distance from the router. I got range extenders so I could run 5ghz for all my TV's and I use the 2.4 for the phones and computers since I rarely if ever stream on them. You lose speed with the extenders, but even with the loss, it's still a quicker stream than the 2.4

https://www.toppctech.com/best-router-for-4k-streaming/
From this guide, I may know that these routers support well for 4k streaming...
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