Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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Level 7

Streaming Players Not Well Described

I have one big gripe with Roku's player packaging and marketing, after purchasing 3 different models. I did not need a fancy player, so started with the SE (cheapest) model. Got home and discovered it would only recognize the 2G (slower) band of the router. After purchasing the more expensive Stick+ because I needed the compact size for the kitchen TV, I discovered that it recognized the high-speed 5G band. Great. I returned the SE and figured I would upgrade to next step up, the Express+, thinking surely it would recognize the 5G.  Nope. It would only see the slower 2G band. So back it went, and I purchased a second Stick+. And no, the issue was not signal strength as I was using it in the same room as the router. And which band is recognized IS an issue, because with the 5G band, new channels load almost instantly. 2G is noticeably slower loading.

ROKU, why don't you be honest with your product descriptions and state which bands your products are capable of recognizing. It would have saved me a whole lot of hassle. I have the Roku Streambar ordered (arrives today), and am hoping it connects to the 5G band.  If not, it's going back.

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3 Replies
Level 21

Re: Streaming Players Not Well Described

I don't know what's on the packaging, but on the details of each player at https://www.roku.com/players if it doesn't mention dual-band wireless (or states single-band) then it's 2.4GHz only.  When Roku uses "+" for a model it can mean just about anything.  It has something the model without the plus doesn't have, but whether or not it's important is up to the buyer.

Unless you're trying to stream your own raw 4k blu-ray rips, 2.4GHz speeds are more than adequate.

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Level 7

Re: Streaming Players Not Well Described


@renojim wrote:

I don't know what's on the packaging, but on the details of each player at https://www.roku.com/players if it doesn't mention dual-band wireless (or states single-band) then it's 2.4GHz only.  When Roku uses "+" for a model it can mean just about anything.  It has something the model without the plus doesn't have, but whether or not it's important is up to the buyer.

Unless you're trying to stream your own raw 4k blu-ray rips, 2.4GHz speeds are more than adequate.


NO. 2.4GHz speeds absolutely are NOT ADEQUATE. You cannot go by theory or anything else except real world activity, and I have proven to myself over and over that 2.4 takes CONSIDERABLY longer to load a channel than 5. Most of the time, 5 will load a new channel within a service such as Sling almost instantly, much like changing channels on cable. 2.4 takes noticeably longer. So I am going with what I KNOW from experience, not what I think or guess.

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Level 21

Re: Streaming Players Not Well Described


@Tinman98 wrote:

@renojim wrote:

I don't know what's on the packaging, but on the details of each player at https://www.roku.com/players if it doesn't mention dual-band wireless (or states single-band) then it's 2.4GHz only.  When Roku uses "+" for a model it can mean just about anything.  It has something the model without the plus doesn't have, but whether or not it's important is up to the buyer.

Unless you're trying to stream your own raw 4k blu-ray rips, 2.4GHz speeds are more than adequate.


NO. 2.4GHz speeds absolutely are NOT ADEQUATE. You cannot go by theory or anything else except real world activity, and I have proven to myself over and over that 2.4 takes CONSIDERABLY longer to load a channel than 5. Most of the time, 5 will load a new channel within a service such as Sling almost instantly, much like changing channels on cable. 2.4 takes noticeably longer. So I am going with what I KNOW from experience, not what I think or guess.


If that's the case then your WiFi either has interference (very possible, it's a crowded band) or a mis-configuration somewhere. Of course, I'm referring to 802.11n as the protocol in use. If you only have an older router with 802.11g, then a speed bottleneck is certainly possible. But if your router has 5 GHz, then it supports .11n. You might check your router and ensure .11n is enabled. While .11g tops out real world at just under 50 Mbps (which should be sufficient for anything online), .11n has an upper limit between 150 and 300 Mbps, which is enough for streaming ripped UHD movies from a server. 

Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Ultra (4670), Ultra (4800), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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