Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

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Dzha2000
Level 7

Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

Hello,

This probably have come up before, but I can't find any previous threads on this.

It seems that Roku doesn't support static IP, is that correct? You pretty much have to have DHCP server on your network to connect Roku stick to network, correct?

If that is the case, would it be possible to have a feature request to have Roku support static IP. There are circumstances where you as a customer need to statically assign an IP to a Roku device in order for you to get it on the network. You can bury that option somewhere in settings so it is not easily accessible.

thank you

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18 Replies
jeffrok
Level 11

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

You could always reserve an IP on the router for a particular Roku device.
Yeah, I got some Rokus.
https://youtu.be/d1CSEeqWl10
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atc98092
Level 13

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

Jeff has offered the only option available. There is no way to configure a static IP address on a Roku device. But you should be able to configure your router to always assign the same IP address to your device. In fact, my Actiontec DSL router does it by default.
Dan
Nvidia Shield, Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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Dzha2000
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

Yes, I agree that is an option. Unfortunately, this is not always acceptable solution. I don't really want to go into details, but it would make my life a lot easier if I could statically assign an IP to Roku. 

Just as an example, let's say that you have flat network in 192.168.1.X/24 space. You want to keep network simple without buying managed switches. Let's say that you have another router on the same 192.168.1.X/24 network but that you need to specify as a default gateway for your Roku. Now you have the issue of having your router giving out DHCP leases with different gateways to figure out. Most consumer based routers will let you pick the network that you want to use as your DHCP scope but they will not let you setup multiple scopes, or specify default gateway. Those routers want to be the default gateways. In this case manually assign statics would make solving this a lot easier.

I was able to solve this issue, but I'm not big fan of my solution. Static IP/subnet/Default gateway would be must simpler solution with a lot less moving parts. 

So, would it possible to file this as a feature request?
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AeroR1
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

why would you have two routers on a flat network?  that's not the definition of a flat network.
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Dzha2000
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

let's just say so the traffic would be routered differently. Let's say one of the routers goes over VPN to another country. 

I believe definition of flat network is a single subnet with no vlans, two routers on the network have nothing to do with it. 
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capatty
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

"Dzha2000" wrote:
let's just say so the traffic would be routered differently. Let's say one of the routers goes over VPN to another country. 

I believe definition of flat network is a single subnet with no vlans, two routers on the network have nothing to do with it. 

If you're a technically inclined person it's probably better to get networking equipment that better fits your needs, or perhaps install custom firmware on your existing that gives you access to more robust networking capabilities. A lot of what you call "consumer based" equipment has a simplistic configuration using dnsmasq and to that extent it can be a bit confusing to say that your network is "flat. " Under typical configurations you are essentially setting up either a double NAT, or seprate NATed networks that speak to the same endpoint. If you attempt to physically bridge the connection by e.g. connecting the LAN ports on each router using a cross-over cable, it's possible that you may experience some anomalous behavior.

Some custom firmwares like DD-WRT and Tomato have more robust network configurations for static IP leasing and iptables firewall rules that allow you to specify gateways. The next tier of "prosumer" networking equipment that run BSD/Unix (e.g. PFsense) or proprietary stuff are able to handle more complex routing schemes.

This feature has been requested multiple times and while I can see the appeal (particularly for being able to statically assign DNS servers) but I don't see why there is an upside for Roku to invest time and resources on building out a feature that a handful of its user base will leverage. There have been a few situations where I would have liked to do this as well, but I think we get what we pay for on this one.
TCL 55 inch 6 Series R613 (SN:YS00W7626058)
TCL 42 inch 5 Series (SN:YS00SA847038)
AVR: Samsung HW-N950 (5.1 DD, DTS+)
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AeroR1
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

"Dzha2000" wrote:
let's just say so the traffic would be routered differently. Let's say one of the routers goes over VPN to another country. 

I believe definition of flat network is a single subnet with no vlans, two routers on the network have nothing to do with it. 


No, that’s not a flat network. Two routers will double nat, unless you put the second router as a bridge, if so, that’s called a switch.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flat_network

“Flat networks are designed to REDUCE the number of ROUTERS and switches on a computer network by connecting the devices to a single switch instead of separate switches.”
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Dzha2000
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

"capatty" wrote:
"Dzha2000" wrote:
let's just say so the traffic would be routered differently. Let's say one of the routers goes over VPN to another country. 

I believe definition of flat network is a single subnet with no vlans, two routers on the network have nothing to do with it. 

If you're a technically inclined person it's probably better to get networking equipment that better fits your needs, or perhaps install custom firmware on your existing that gives you access to more robust networking capabilities. A lot of what you call "consumer based" equipment has a simplistic configuration using dnsmasq and to that extent it can be a bit confusing to say that your network is "flat. " Under typical configurations you are essentially setting up either a double NAT, or seprate NATed networks that speak to the same endpoint. If you attempt to physically bridge the connection by e.g. connecting the LAN ports on each router using a cross-over cable, it's possible that you may experience some anomalous behavior.

Some custom firmwares like DD-WRT and Tomato have more robust network configurations for static IP leasing and iptables firewall rules that allow you to specify gateways. The next tier of "prosumer" networking equipment that run BSD/Unix (e.g. PFsense) or proprietary stuff are able to handle more complex routing schemes.

This feature has been requested multiple times and while I can see the appeal (particularly for being able to statically assign DNS servers) but I don't see why there is an upside for Roku to invest time and resources on building out a feature that a handful of its user base will leverage. There have been a few situations where I would have liked to do this as well, but I think we get what we pay for on this one.

I completely agree with you. I can achieve what I'm trying to do multiple ways, WRT and Tomato would be another. I can do the same with entry level business class hardware, but then again, why do I want my life complicated. Again, I was able to achieve what I'm trying to do by other means. It is just more complex than it has to be. I'm all about simplicity. I can greatly reduce the complexity by having ability to statically assign IP information. That's all.
I don't believe it would cost Roku billions of dollars to implement static IP as a feature. I knew that this feature was already requested in the past. I'm just hoping that if enough people ask for it, Roku will be nice enough to implement it. 
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Dzha2000
Level 7

Re: Statically assign IP to Roku sticks

"AeroR1" wrote:
"Dzha2000" wrote:
let's just say so the traffic would be routered differently. Let's say one of the routers goes over VPN to another country. 

I believe definition of flat network is a single subnet with no vlans, two routers on the network have nothing to do with it. 


No, that’s not a flat network. Two routers will double nat, unless you put the second router as a bridge, if so, that’s called a switch.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flat_network

“Flat networks are designed to REDUCE the number of ROUTERS and switches on a computer network by connecting the devices to a single switch instead of separate switches.”

reduce the number of routers and switched within your network. In my case I have a single network (one subnet) and 2 routes out. Also a lot of definitions are so washed out these days. 
Anyways, we are here not to discuss what the true definition of flat network is. We are trying to ask Roku to implement ability to statically assign IP information. That is all. 
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