Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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LouGots
Level 7

Roku Ultra using 10GB+ per day! Why?

We had a similar problem with our Roku. We finally tried disconnecting the power 120V power to the Roku which believe or not, solved the issue. It appears the Roku continuously streams data even though the TV is off. Have you been given any other reason? I would be interested to know.

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atc98092
Community Streaming Expert

Re: Roku Ultra using 10GB+ per day! Why?


@LouGots wrote:

It appears the Roku continuously streams data even though the TV is off. Have you been given any other reason? I would be interested to know.


The Roku has no idea if your TV is on or off. It is running independent of the TV and will stream as long as something is selected to play. You must always return to the Home screen (press the home button on the remote, it's the top right button) before turning the TV off.

This would happen with any streaming player. It's not specific to a Roku.

Dan

Roku Community Streaming Expert

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I am not a Roku employee.
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Triin
Level 7

Re: Roku Ultra using 10GB+ per day! Why?

This is what I have done.

Since the Roku cannot control the bandwidth / streaming quality ( as most are controlled by the individual services ie- Amazon , Netflix, etc)  What this means is, for example Amazon, has adaptive resolution. If you are on a data cap, regardless of that cap, Amazon will stream the highest available quality determined by the data. There are no settings in Amazon to lower quality. Same goes for most other streaming services ( except Disney+) . 
Since I have a data cap ( using strictly cell hotspots ) I had to trick the Roku into thinking it had much less data than I was actually receiving. To do this, I purchased a dedicated router that has QoS ( or quality of service) . This enables me to set the outgoing data of the router to a number I can control ( like 1500kbps/ 1.5mbps . Any device that connects to this router will only be able to download and upload a max amount of 1.5kbps. 
what this means is, the Roku connected is only able to use that much data thereby telling Amazon to use that adaptive resolution. My cell hotspots last 3 times as long now and the picture looks decent at the dedicated bitrate I assigned. 
This is the only work around I could think of to force data and bitrate to the number I wanted to use. 
For those who want to try, play with QoS to a cap that works for you but I assure everyone reading this that it works phenomenally. 😀