Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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TonyinCNY--
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Wow, this sure has been an educational and informative experience for me thanks to you folks.  Now, I'm a bit embarrassed by my "yelling" at Netgear for what I thought was a crappy wifi router.  I didn't realize that it was fairly normal for a wifi router to cut the Internet speed in half.  It would be interesting to hear from other folks about that and see what their experiences are with various routers and how it affects their Internet speed.
Oh, another question.  If a wifi router cuts Internet speed in half will it also have the same effect when plugging an Ethernet cable into the router?  I'd hate to lose Internet speed to my computer, too.
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twiceover
Level 11

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

A wired connection should be fine.  Wireless is highly dependent on all the equipment involved being capable of the speeds you are after.  One thing I always note to people is "Does it matter"?  "Can you see a difference"?  Most streaming services will use 3-8mbps which can be handled by every current generation wireless standards.  Outside of running speed tests, you probably would never notice you have "half" the speed.
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TonyinCNY--
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

You're right.  The only way I knew I was at half speed was by running a speed test.  You're also right that a hard-wired connection is fine.  But, I have been wanting to add another Roku upstairs in the bedroom.  They have some nice "night" sounds like rainfall, thunderstorms etc. that would help put me to sleep.  So, it's either put the Roku's on a wifi connection or also buy another computer and then run a new coax line thru the floor to hook into the modem that's downstairs.  And I'd still have to put in a hard-wire router to hook into the Internet.  Seems like a wifi for the Roku's might be the easiest way.  Plus, I do have that Netgear wifi that I wasn't using.
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atc98092
Level 16

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Wireless in and of itself does not reduce your speed by half, or any other amount. Different wireless protocols have different speed capabilities. For example, the older 802.11g only supports 54 Mbps. And remember that these are theoretical maximums. Real world speeds are usually 8-10% slower. 802.11n is capable of 600 Mbps, but many manufacturers sell slower versions. I've seen 11n routers rated at 150 and 300 Mbps. Also, 11n support dual band, both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. The higher band is quieter (less interference) so generally is faster than the same connection at 2.4 GHz. The newestr version, 802.11ac, is dual band, and offers in excess of 1 Gbps speeds. But since the network connections the router has are either 100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps (Gigabit), you can't use the higher speeds. 
.
So, if your WiFi was set to 802.11g, then yes your Internet speed was cut in half. But if you have even the slowest 11n router it should be capable of matching your Internet speed fairly close. 
Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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TonyinCNY--
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Now you've got me wondering.  I don't remember reading much of the manual when I set up the Netgear wifi router before.  But, now that I look over the 178 page manual, I realize that I may be the cause of the half speed problem by not following all the directions.  I see that it does have 802.11n security and up to 450 Mbps speed at 2.4 GHz and 1300 Mbps speed at 5.0 GHz.  That should be able to handle my 100 Mbps Spectrum Internet speed with no problem whatsoever.  So, I'm thinking that the reason my speed was cut in half was due to my not setting up the router properly.  I probably started reading the 178 page manual and my eyes glazed over from all the information.  So, I just connected to the Internet with whatever setting was automatic.  I'm glad you got me thinking about this so I can correct my laziness and, hopefully, get the router set up correctly.
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NightHawk
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Those wifi theoretical max speed figures are never realistic in practice.  

For example, 1300Mbps with 5Ghz ac requires all 3 antennas both at the router end and the client end and located right next to the router.
In practice many devices only have one antenna that cuts the speed to 1/3 (433Mbps max) for ac again right next to the router.  More likely if the Roku is located a couple rooms away from the router the speed can easily drop to under 100Mbps, thats quite normal.  But again even 20-30Mbps is more than enough for streaming HD video.

The 450Mbps max for 2.4Ghz again assumes 3 antennas also its for with a double bandwidth which is not recommended for the crowded 2.4Ghz band, so more realistic max for a standard bandwidth with only one antenna on the client device would be 75Mbps, right next to the router.  So further away 20-30Mbps is more likely assuming no interference from neighbors on the same channels which is very limited on the 2.4Ghz band.
Roku Ultra 4640R, Roku Streaming Stick+ 3810R
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twiceover
Level 11

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Another thing to note is that the speeds advertised are for "Combined Both Directions" both up and downstream.  So while it may be advertised as 450mbps, even in best case scenario it is only 225mbps down or up.

Marketing...
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TonyinCNY--
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

You guys are right.  I just noticed the two magic words in the speed description - UP TO.  So, it has speeds (under ideal conditions) of up to such and such a specified Mbps speed.
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Stand
Level 7

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

Swap the ethernet cables PC and Roku. If the Roku still fails using the PC cable it's not the cable.

Update: I failed to read through the thread. Sorry you're way past my suggestion.

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dgrace
Level 10

Re: Hard Wired Roku Problem

No need for second computer to wire a second roku. Your router most likely has four LAN ports, each can run to a networked device, be that a printer, roku, webcam etc. But, as long as you get adequate signal you should have no issues with streaming ambient sound for sleep.

"I might be moving to Montana soon..."
FZ
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