Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"SherriL69" wrote:
Does anyone know how far away the original SD Roku player can be from my wireless router?


I think it mostly depends on how far your wireless network broadcasts. I have an older HD box (has the same non-n wireless talents as the SD box, if I remember correctly) and I've taken it to every room in my house.
Roku 3 (4230X) / 42" Sharp LED 1080p HDTV / RadioShack Amplified Indoor Antenna
Roku SE (2710X) / 25" Sharp SDTV / GE Indoor Antenna
ATT Uverse 18.0 Mbps / Motorola NVG589 Gateway
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

Brand new out of the box unit will not connect to the wireless. It sees the wireless device, even connects to the wireless, but then I get the cannot connect to local network. I tried everything I could find on the internet and it still did not work. Guess I will return to Amazon for a refund. It should be plug and play. My router is even on the recommended list. Guess I will wait until a better unit comes out, maybe google tv?
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"monsterike" wrote:
Brand new out of the box unit will not connect to the wireless. It sees the wireless device, even connects to the wireless, but then I get the cannot connect to local network. I tried everything I could find on the internet and it still did not work. Guess I will return to Amazon for a refund. It should be plug and play. My router is even on the recommended list. Guess I will wait until a better unit comes out, maybe google tv?


guess so

(I like the passive aggressive commentary, by the way. I'm sure the engineers at roku are gnashing their teeth while the team at google is high-fiving after reading it.)
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Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

Worked great until tonight. Unplugged it to let it rest for a few hours. Plugged it back in and said it was connected to ethernet, which it never has been. Would not see any wireless networks and would not let me select not shown. Performed factory reset to no avail. It is an older HD model. Any suggestions? Thanks, Mark
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

My brand new XD|S wouldn't connect wirelessly during the initial setup either.

After an hour of resets and tweaking, I turned encryption OFF for my router. The Roku hit and connected immediately. After the Roku got the software update, I turned the router encryption back on.

I think the Roku prompted me for the network password after that, and it has performed flawlessly since.
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

I got my Roku yeserday and struggled to get it to connect wirelessly. FWIW I had similar challenges with a WDTV box (was too many DNS entries sent by my router), but could NOT get the Roku to connect.
I work in networking, know my way around a packet, but simply could not get the Roku to conenct after changing nearly every wireless network setting on my router.

Pure magic - I pulled a long cable, connected over a wired connection, it updated THEN would connect wirelessly with no issues or challenges.

So - please add to this 101 - update your box over a cable if you have any wireless issues!!!

HTH someone,
tim
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

I've just ordered a second Roku XD-S box. The principal use is for a visually-impaired person in my household to view Netflix content on a second set(an older analog model) just about 20 feet from the first Roku box connected to an HDTV. I am not interested in viewing a different program on the second box/TV set, just the same program on both displays simultaneously. I have a DSL Extreme 3.0MB connection and a dual-band DLink router, all of which works very well. Exactly how should this second Roku box be properly connected to do this, and is separate registration needed for the second box under these circumstances? What's the best way to get this all connected? Would appreciate some expert advice in this forum. This appears to be a type of networking(?)
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"mrsmith" wrote:
I've just ordered a second Roku XD-S box. The principal use is for a visually-impaired person in my household to view Netflix content on a second set(an older analog model) just about 20 feet from the first Roku box connected to an HDTV. I am not interested in viewing a different program on the second box/TV set, just the same program on both displays simultaneously. I have a DSL Extreme 3.0MB connection and a dual-band DLink router, all of which works very well. Exactly how should this second Roku box be properly connected to do this, and is separate registration needed for the second box under these circumstances? What's the best way to get this all connected? Would appreciate some expert advice in this forum. This appears to be a type of networking(?)


There's nothing special about what you are describing, or, rather, nothing different. There is no connection between the two boxes. You will set the second box up the same way as your first. There are a few thing to be aware of, however:

If your goal is really just to have a simultaneous picture on another TV, you could just get a long set of RCA cables and hook the second TV to the same box you currently have. Hook the composite connection to the old TV and the HDMI or component connection to the HDTV. They'll work at the same time, I hear, but I don't know how the image settings would best be set...you might be forced to watch only SD output on your HDTV if you wanted both sets to have a correctly formatted picture.

If you do use a second box, it doesn't matter if you choose to watch the same thing or a different thing, you'll still be watching a different stream on each box. You'll need enough network bandwidth to do this...3Mbps may be barely enough for 2 SD streams, but if you're watching HD on the HDTV, you will almost certainly not be able to watch anything on the second box.
And you'll need to be careful with the remote control or box placement as to not control one box when you mean to control the other.
It's also unlikely that you be able to watch the two boxes in perfect sync, if that is your goal. It's not like you can tell one box to "display what the other box is showing." You will rather just set Movie X playing on box one, then aim the control at box two and set Movie X playing on it. It's doubtful, even if you started them at the same moment, that sound and picture would play in perfect sync if that's your intention.

If so, better to run the extra cable from one box.
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Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

thanks for all the hard work and info, it gives me a place to start. One question, in your humble opinion, do I really need Roku if I plan on keeping at least basic cable and can download netflix with an internet connection and a router? What is the benefit specifically of Roku? I am apparently the uninformed consumer, which is not usually the spot I'm in!
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Level 9

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"flwrgirl" wrote:
thanks for all the hard work and info, it gives me a place to start. One question, in your humble opinion, do I really need Roku if I plan on keeping at least basic cable and can download netflix with an internet connection and a router? What is the benefit specifically of Roku? I am apparently the uninformed consumer, which is not usually the spot I'm in!


If you are happy using Netflix on a computer and
it's monitor, then no you don't need a Roku. In my
case I have several under powered computers, (I'm
using a Netbook right now), that can't stream
Netflix, (even if Linux was supported).

The Roku streaming media player really shines
when used with a nice larger monitor, (or T.V.),
and good sound system, (or T.V. with good sound).
Arwen Evenstar
Middle Earth
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