Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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mkiker2089
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"edvalson" wrote:
I have a linksys WRT400N which created two SSIDs. One is linksys, which is configured to use the 2.4GHz band, and linksys_media which is supposed to use the 5GHz band.

My connection speeds are totally fine, but nonetheless I would like to specifically assign my soundbridge and my roku video player to the 5GHz SSID. At this point I don't know if it's being used at all.

linksys_media has its own config on the router, and I have a password set for it. But it doesn't appear to broadcast itself, and if I try to attach to it by name it fails.

I realize this is a question for linksys but I've found almost nothing on this topic and was wondering if any roku users were using this feature or had any suggestions.


5gig is the n band, 2.4 is the g band. Most wireless devices are G and as far as I know N isn't locked down yet spec wise. You'll simply have to rely on G.
-Marshall-

Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
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edvalson
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

OK, thanks very much.
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ParkerRoku
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

People would have a lot less problems with their Roku, or pick whatever other internet requiring video player you want, if they set up their router and modem behind the TV.
I am not sure why everyone has their computer, which requires the least amount of feed from the router, directly connected, while all the video players require a huge feed, and need the most stable connection, are sitting 50, 60 feet across the house and relying on a constant stable speed feed.

mkiker, if you want to get the Soundbridge and the Roku on the 5ghz, use a N Duo bridge, like the DLink DAP-1522, approx. $90, and wire both devices directly to it. This is assuming both items are in the same spot. If not, you would need two bridges which would get a little pricey.
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brunson
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"ParkerRoku" wrote:
People would have a lot less problems with their Roku, or pick whatever other internet requiring video player you want, if they set up their router and modem behind the TV.
I am not sure why everyone has their computer, which requires the least amount of feed from the router, directly connected, while all the video players require a huge feed, and need the most stable connection, are sitting 50, 60 feet across the house and relying on a constant stable speed feed.

Probably because people locate their network connections close to the computer before they have a streaming device.
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Highlighted
devrdander
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"mkiker2089" wrote:

5gig is the n band, 2.4 is the g band. Most wireless devices are G and as far as I know N isn't locked down yet spec wise. You'll simply have to rely on G.


Sorry can't stand wrong information.

5ghz is the A radio, 2.4ghz is the B/G radio, N can run on both (depending on gear) and most consumer gear actually still uses the 2.4ghz radios since they are cheaper. N just means that the gear uses MIMO (Multi in Multi out, or multiple antenna's and a wider frequency). Also 802.11N is suppose to be ratified this month and the final spec published in November. Currently 802.11 gear is all "Draft" but all still follows a fairly standard spec. However I don't recommend mixing manufacturers (Note that dlink, linksys, etc, don't make their own chips and often use the same chipsets, but they do write their own drivers usually and so I suggest you don't mix there either).
-Seth
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Running a speed test on my Roku

My Roku and router are not in the same room. Is there any way to runna speed test on my Roku player to see how fast it is actually working?
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Mark12547
Level 7

Re: Running a speed test on my Roku

"Netflix_Fanatic_420" wrote:
My Roku and router are not in the same room. Is there any way to runna speed test on my Roku player to see how fast it is actually working?


There is a diagnostic message you can turn on. When the Roku Digital Video Player begins playing a Netflix stream, it displays the speed of the bitstream and an estimate of how fast it thinks the network is.

I don't know if it works with other streams or if it is just with the Netflix streams.

To get to the screen, on the remote (or the rokuRemote.exe computer remote control), do Home Home Home Home Home Rewind Rewind Rewind FastForward FastForward, each keypress spaced out about half a second. (That's 5 Homes, 3 Rewinds, 2 FastForwards). If timing is successful, you will be shown a screen where you can pick a specific bitstream, but also on that screen, near the bottom, is an option to turn on diagnostics (or if the diagnostics are already on, will show an option to turn off diagnostics).

The diagnostic message seems to remain on the screen forever, but it is probably 10 to 15 seconds.
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emcwiz
Level 7

HELP it appears 'debug' is saying only 0.5MB is available...

Ok, I've read some of the threads and see that Texas (I am in Michigan) slows down the traffic quite a bit...I've experimented with 'internet speed tests' which do show that Texas is at 1MB and 0.1MB while local is 15MB and 1.5MB, Seattle is 6MB and 0.6MB...

using cmd..traccert to moviecontrol.netflix does show that in Texas the ping speed is over 100ms THREE different servers...ARG....

So, what is the solution?

Call Roku?
Call Netflix?
Call Texas (just kidding)?

Help!

Thank you.
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vmps
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

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emcwiz
Level 7

vmps - thank you

thanks vmps, I did review and attempted to apply what I learned...but...

The symptoms I am having appears to be a caused by an ISP turning off the valve. The connection begins as four (4) dots, remains at four (4) dots for about 5-10 seconds, then degrades to 1 or 2 dots.

This is true for both the Roku box and when I use any of the computers to view 'watch it now' on Netflix.

I have Broadstripe as an ISP in Michigan, they claim they are not limiting the download speed (16MB/1.6MB, typical).

I typically use OpenDNS, this morning I tried two local DNS servers as well as all zero's (rely on Broadstripe's DNS)...no changes in performance.

I even used this, which was recommended by Netflix tech support last night, and I too throttles down from 2MB to 0.3MB after 10 seconds or so:
www.iis.net/media/experiencesmoothstreaming

So, I remain fustrated...is there anything I am missing?

Thanks again!
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