Network - Wireless & Wired Connections

Help & troubleshooting for network issues, including connecting your device to your home Wi-Fi network, connecting to public networks, troubleshooting wireless issues & ethernet connections, and optimizing streaming performance.
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devrdander
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

Just try it on channels 1, 6, or 11, those are the most recommended channels... If you find one that works then you should be ok.
-Seth
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wingnutzero
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

It looks like things have improved. I switched to the OpenDNS servers, powered off my Netflix box for a couple of minutes and then physically moved it to have a better "line of sight" with my router antenna. I tested the connection with a short "Masters of Horror" episode and got 4 stars immediately, but it stopped and went down to 2 stars after a couple of minutes. After I paused it for a while, it went back up to 4 stars when I resumed play and stayed there.

Many thanks for the suggestions.
Owner/admin www.streamingsoon.com
Where Netflix users find out what's coming to Watch Instantly
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buckminster
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

I have comcast and I tried using the OpenDNS servers globally (set at the router) to possibly improve some non-netflix player issues I had, but it actually made my netflix player performance worse like longer starts to buffer, stalling and rebuffering part way through the viewing which I never experienced with comcast's servers (yes, I power cycled the netflix player between DNS server setting changes). Once I set the router setting back, the netflix player behaved properly.

Just letting people know that DNS server settings can definitely effect performance.
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so confused!

hi,

just received my box, but my excitement was defeated when i realized i needed to set up a network in my house. i'd only been using a computer directly wired to a broadband modem. i went out and bought a Linksys 5-port Ethernet Switch, thinking that it would be a logical way to split the access to my modem (between my computer and my netflix player). The device worked great and was easy to set up, but my player couldn't complete its setup because it couldn't connect to the network. i spoke to someone on the Roku tech support hotline, and i was told that i'm required to have a wireless router no matter if i only want a wired connection. he explained it as the simple ethernet switch could only handle one ISP address at a time(?) but that a wireless router is more capable of handling this situation.


is this true?
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Mark12547
Level 7

Re: so confused!

"happenstance17" wrote:
hi,

just received my box, but my excitement was defeated when i realized i needed to set up a network in my house. i'd only been using a computer directly wired to a broadband modem. i went out and bought a Linksys 5-port Ethernet Switch, thinking that it would be a logical way to split the access to my modem (between my computer and my netflix player). The device worked great and was easy to set up, but my player couldn't complete its setup because it couldn't connect to the network. i spoke to someone on the Roku tech support hotline, and i was told that i'm required to have a wireless router no matter if i only want a wired connection. he explained it as the simple ethernet switch could only handle one ISP address at a time(?) but that a wireless router is more capable of handling this situation.


is this true?


No, it is not true, neither by the instructions for the Box nor by the way I am running it at home.

Two very common themes and a third, less common theme for "Unable to connect to the Internet" are:

1. The router's firewall is blocking access; try disabling the firewall in the router. (I had to do that.)

2. The first DNS Server address the router is handing over to the Roku box is having problems resolving the address the Box needs to talk to. Try configuring the DNS Server addresses in the router to OpenDNS:

Primary DNS: 208.67.222.222
Secondary DNS: 208.67.220.220

You can read up on OpenDNS (complete with instructions for configuring the DNS addresses of many routers) at http://www.opendns.com/

3. The Roku box requires DHCP to dynamically allocate an internal network address to it. This is the default for most routers, but you might want to double-check that you have DHCP and NAT enabled.

In any case, please report back your success or lack thereof.
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wideasleep1
Level 7

Re: so confused!

"happenstance17" wrote:
hi,

just received my box, but my excitement was defeated when i realized i needed to set up a network in my house. i'd only been using a computer directly wired to a broadband modem. i went out and bought a Linksys 5-port Ethernet Switch, thinking that it would be a logical way to split the access to my modem (between my computer and my netflix player). The device worked great and was easy to set up, but my player couldn't complete its setup because it couldn't connect to the network. i spoke to someone on the Roku tech support hotline, and i was told that i'm required to have a wireless router no matter if i only want a wired connection. he explained it as the simple ethernet switch could only handle one ISP address at a time(?) but that a wireless router is more capable of handling this situation.


is this true?


No. Any router will do..it does NOT have to be wireless/WAP enabled. I would still recommend buying a cheap wireless router, and simply diabling the wireless radio (in settings) if you only want wired lan. This one should do:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a ... 6833124010
G'Luck!
Then as it was, then again it will be
An' though the course may change sometimes,
rivers always reach the sea

M1000x2,M2000,Twonky 4.3.3 RC1 beta on LinkStation HGLAN400gig,Buffalo whr-g54s on DD-WRTfirmware-luv'in it!
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markens
Level 7

Re: so confused!

"happenstance17" wrote:
hi,

just received my box, but my excitement was defeated when i realized i needed to set up a network in my house. i'd only been using a computer directly wired to a broadband modem. i went out and bought a Linksys 5-port Ethernet Switch, thinking that it would be a logical way to split the access to my modem (between my computer and my netflix player). The device worked great and was easy to set up, but my player couldn't complete its setup because it couldn't connect to the network. i spoke to someone on the Roku tech support hotline, and i was told that i'm required to have a wireless router no matter if i only want a wired connection. he explained it as the simple ethernet switch could only handle one ISP address at a time(?) but that a wireless router is more capable of handling this situation.


is this true?


To clarify some answers already posted: The advice you got from tech support was basically sound, in that you need a router (wired or wireless) to solve your problem. Underlying issue is that the broadband modem can only have one "client" device. You must add a router to enable more than one device to talk to it. An ethernet switch does not provide this functionality.
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digixmax
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

Does the Roku Netflix Player make use of P2P in video downloading?
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Highlighted
devrdander
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"digixmax" wrote:
Does the Roku Netflix Player make use of P2P in video downloading?


No
-Seth
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AllenAllen
Level 7

Re: FAQ: Networking 101 and your Roku Player

"billrick" wrote:
Just wanted to say THANKS!!! I was having trouble with a slow connection, and I have a super fast cable modem, so that one dot quality was extremely irritating. Based on your sticky, I checked for QoS (disabled), Double NAT (nope), and then found that I share a channel with 3 of my neighbors. Doh!

I switched to channel 1 and did a power down, and I now have 4 dot quality! Sweet! Thanks again, you rock!

-B


How did you find that you shared a channel with 3 of your neighbors?
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