Getting Started - Setup & How-to

Help getting started with Roku devices, including setup, connecting your device to your TV, linking a Roku device to your account at my.roku.com/link, adding channels, subscribing to services, and more.
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RhymeGuy01
Level 7

How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that charge

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My television receiver is High Definition but is ten years old. It cost near $3000. I don't have funds to but a newer model and this one works perfectly. It doesn't have the type of HDMI jacks that can charge devices. Will Roku work with my receiver? If so, are any other components needed to purchase to ensure that this is so? Futhermore, my house has WIFI. Presuming that the ROKU can connect to the HDMI jack (with or without other interfacing equipment), can the ROKU receive the streaming service via my household WIFI? (It is not possible to tether the Roku directly to my router which is in a different room in the house.)

Thanks in advance.

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RhymeGuy01
Level 7

Re: How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that ch

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Thank you for the reply. My television set does indeed have built-in HDMI ports. It just doesn't have any ports that charge connected devices. I understand you said HDMI doesn't charge anything but I read on someone's post that said that it did so I presumed that was correct information. Thanks for setting the record straight. Now that I know Roku works with WIFI, I'm good to go. I simply need to purchase one and connect it to my HDMI port and plug it into electricity (provided it requires electricity from a wall receptacle). 

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atc98092
Level 16

Re: How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that ch

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@RhymeGuy01 wrote:

My television receiver is High Definition but is ten years old. It cost near $3000. I don't have funds to but a newer model and this one works perfectly. It doesn't have the type of HDMI jacks that can charge devices. Will Roku work with my receiver? If so, are any other components needed to purchase to ensure that this is so? Futhermore, my house has WIFI. Presuming that the ROKU can connect to the HDMI jack (with or without other interfacing equipment), can the ROKU receive the streaming service via my household WIFI? (It is not possible to tether the Roku directly to my router which is in a different room in the house.)

Thanks in advance.


I believe you are confusing HDMI and USB. HDMI cannot charge devices like USB can. HDMI is a video/audio transport protocol that is also capable of passing Ethernet on properly equipped devices. 

Can you provide the make and model of your TV so we can look up its specifications?

So, does your TV have HDMI ports? If so, it's possible any Roku will work just fine. However, some HDTVs that old might not support the resolutions necessary for a Roku to work. Many of those old TVs will only accept 1080i or 540p (SD) via HDMI. No current Roku player supports either resolution. If your TV accepts 720p, then you are good with a Roku as well.

Now, assuming you have a TV that doesn't support a Roku via HDMI, you really only have one other option. You would need to something to convert the HDMI digital output to analog. Your TV will almost certainly have component input jacks (three RCA jacks colored red, green and blue), The audio also has to be converted to analog (red and white RCA jacks). Component video can be 540, 720 or 1080, so you can get either SD or HD from it. Such a converter can be found on Amazon for as little as $20 to much higher. I've never used such a device, so can't offer any opinion as to how well it would work. But be aware that Roku doesn't officially support using such a converter, so might not be able to provide any assistance if you have a problem. 

While there is one recent Roku player with analog output cables, it only outputs SD video, and that would be a waste on your HDTV. 

Every Roku device supports WiFi, and for almost all of them it's the only method used to connect to your network. Only the Ultra has a network jack.

Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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jmaurer
Level 7

Re: How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that ch

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I have a similar issue.  Big Box store suggested a RCA-to-HDMI converter and audio/video cables (only red white and yellow). It sounds like I need a new set of cables with red white and yellow on one end and blue, green,red white and red on the other. Is this right? My TV 2 sets of ports: red, white and yellow and another set that's blue, green, red, white and red. 

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RhymeGuy01
Level 7

Re: How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that ch

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Thank you for the reply. My television set does indeed have built-in HDMI ports. It just doesn't have any ports that charge connected devices. I understand you said HDMI doesn't charge anything but I read on someone's post that said that it did so I presumed that was correct information. Thanks for setting the record straight. Now that I know Roku works with WIFI, I'm good to go. I simply need to purchase one and connect it to my HDMI port and plug it into electricity (provided it requires electricity from a wall receptacle). 

View solution in original post

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atc98092
Level 16

Re: How to get Roku to work on a 10-year old HDTV that has regular HDMI inputs but not those that ch

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@jmaurer wrote:

I have a similar issue.  Big Box store suggested a RCA-to-HDMI converter and audio/video cables (only red white and yellow). It sounds like I need a new set of cables with red white and yellow on one end and blue, green,red white and red on the other. Is this right? My TV 2 sets of ports: red, white and yellow and another set that's blue, green, red, white and red. 


The connections with the blue/red/green jacks are component, not composite. Roku hasn't offered component out support for many years. The advantage to component is possible support for HD (720, perhaps 1080). However, some TV component inputs only support SD, so without knowing your TV model number I can't look it up. 

So, if your HDMI to analog converter supports component out, then you need the blue, green, red, white and red cables (the last red/white set are audio). If it only supports composite out, then you need yellow/red/white cables. 

Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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