Discussions

More than a smart TV—a better TV. Learn more about using your Roku TV, locate help resources, and share your experience.
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Roku Newbie here. Some Roku TV questions.

Hello

I decided the other day to cut the cord. There is enough apps and streaming services out there that I feel I wont miss cable much.

After reading reviews I decided on buying two Rokus for my house.

The First is a Premier Plus 4K that is hooked up to my LG OLED 4k Tv.

The second is an express plus that is hooked up to my almost 10 year old Panasonic Vierra Plasma HD TV.


Having said that would like to start with some questions...


1. On the Premier, why advertise it as a 4k device yet only make it 802.11n (2.4 ghz) compatible? I know they say 4k only needs about 24mbps but I live on a house with many devices connected to my router and most run on that band. At night, my my sons are watching netflix on an xbox 360 and an old apple tv (i hate the remote on that thing) donated to us by a family member (they prob hate the remote too). Should I be concerned about the band with?


2. The express seems slower and took a lot longer to load than the Premier. Plus its remote doesn't have volume controls on it and it seems more sluggish to respond to command (could the be due to an IR instead of RF remote?)... would it be a waste of money to buy another premier plus and place it on the older plasma TV even though it wont use any 4k features?

0 Kudos
2 Replies
atc98092
Level 15

Re: Roku Newbie here. Some questions.

1. Depending on the source, streamed 4K is usually about 15-16Mbps maximum. Back when I had Netflix, I watched a test video that showed its bitrate and resolution in real time. It would switch to 2160 (4K) at about 9 Mbps and max out at 16. Someone recently reported that they now max out at 15. I don't now for sure ho high Amazon goes at 4K, but most likely about the same. The only time you'll likely see bitrates over 20 Mbps is by streaming media from your own server. My ripped UHD movies can exceed 100 Mbps, and I do encounter buffering with my Roku players. But it's more my wireless access point isn't doing its job well. Since my Shield has a Gigabit Ethernet connection, it naturally plays them fine. Don't forget that 802.11N is capable of close to 300 Mbps on 2.4GHz, so I wouldn't be too concerned about it. The bigger issue is how fast your wireless connection is to the rest of your network. If it's only Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps), then it's possible you could max out your wireless with multiple devices using it all at the same time. But if it's Gigabit, and your Internet speed is fast enough, there shouldn't be an issue.
.
2. The Express and Premiere+ are both reported to have the same CPU. I don't know if they have the same amount of memory, but most likely the Premiere+ has more. But yes the Express has an IR remote and can have issues with the beam being blocked. The The Premiere also has an IR remote, but the Premiere+ has a WiFI Direct remote. I don't notice any lag using my Premiere (not a + model, so almost the same as your Express). 
Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
0 Kudos
ronfelder
Level 8

Re: Roku Newbie here. Some questions.

"atc98092" wrote:
1. Depending on the source, streamed 4K is usually about 15-16Mbps maximum. Back when I had Netflix, I watched a test video that showed its bitrate and resolution in real time. It would switch to 2160 (4K) at about 9 Mbps and max out at 16. Someone recently reported that they now max out at 15. I don't now for sure ho high Amazon goes at 4K, but most likely about the same. The only time you'll likely see bitrates over 20 Mbps is by streaming media from your own server. My ripped UHD movies can exceed 100 Mbps, and I do encounter buffering with my Roku players. But it's more my wireless access point isn't doing its job well. Since my Shield has a Gigabit Ethernet connection, it naturally plays them fine. Don't forget that 802.11N is capable of close to 300 Mbps on 2.4GHz, so I wouldn't be too concerned about it. The bigger issue is how fast your wireless connection is to the rest of your network. If it's only Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps), then it's possible you could max out your wireless with multiple devices using it all at the same time. But if it's Gigabit, and your Internet speed is fast enough, there shouldn't be an issue.
.
2. The Express and Premiere+ are both reported to have the same CPU. I don't know if they have the same amount of memory, but most likely the Premiere+ has more. But yes the Express has an IR remote and can have issues with the beam being blocked. The The Premiere also has an IR remote, but the Premiere+ has a WiFI Direct remote. I don't notice any lag using my Premiere (not a + model, so almost the same as your Express). 

Use the remote on your smart phone. Then you'll be connected by WIFI. Problem solved and much cheaper.
Roku 2xs (3100x), Roku Express (3900x) ,Roku Ultra (4660RW) .FIOS Quantum modem router, Verizon FIOS 100/100, LG HDTV 42LH90, Pioneer VSX-920 Audio/Video Multi Channel Receiver
0 Kudos