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C_I
Level 12

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@rowkoo1234 wrote:

@C_I wrote:

Ethernet connections are NOT necessary for modern Internet connections.

Straw man - I never said they were. I said they were preferable in certain circumstances where mobility is not a necessity.

@C_I wrote:

Why? [... a whole bunch of stuff supporting the straw man that we're not talking about ...]

 


@C_I wrote:

Sometimes cable Internet went out even though the cable TV did not. The reason for that was the bandwith was so low.  

No. It's because they were separate systems. They ran at different frequencies and didn't share bandwidth.


cable-stream.png


@C_I wrote:

[...more support / counter-arguments regarding the straw man...]

@C_I wrote:

you can get AT&T high speed Internet


Again, we're not talking about a connection to the internet, we're talking about connections to our internal network. Roku can connect to DLNA servers on your local network. I can take my cable modem out of my house, I can cancel my subscription to my internet provider, and I can still use the Roku to connect to my server to watch my home movies and listen to my music. Everything you say about the internet is off topic.

My point is: my wireless spectrum is saturated, a wired connection will help me. If Roku wants my money, they'll provide a wired solution. If they don't want it, that's their choice.


     And the link you provided is for  the Roku Media player-but the way you connect to your Roku player is through the Internet. And it requires the Internet to operate. And yes, you can take it to a hotel, and hook it into their TV, but when you set it up, it still searches for a network to connect to.  And once you connect to their Internet network, then you can connect to any server such as Plex or Roku Media Player. And, your wireless spectrum wouldn't be saturated if you had high speed Internet, separate from your dedicated wireless spectrum that Direct TV uses.

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rowkoo1234
Level 9

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@C_I wrote:
     And the link you provided is for  the Roku Media player-but the way you connect to your Roku player is through the Internet. And it requires the Internet to operate.

The Roku does not require the internet to operate. Both my Roku3 and Roku Ultra work just fine without the internet. Yes, I've tested it by unplugging the internet modem. The Roku Media Player DLNA "channel" link I provided is a client app specifically for playing media stored on your local network and does not require an internet connection.

@C_I wrote:


And yes, you can take it to a hotel, and hook it into their TV, but when you set it up, it still searches for a network to connect to.

I normally take Roku sticks to hotels which, given how mobile they are, are necessarily wireless. They're too small to have an Ethernet jack and I wouldn't want or need them to.

And yes, the Roku sticks and the Roku 3 and Roku Ultra support and can search for wireless networks, but the R3 and RU, if you've got them plugged into the wired net, they'll get assigned an IP address from the router and will be on the physical network, no wireless needed. They can check to see if they have internet access, but if they don't, the Media Player will still be able to find and access any and all DLNA servers on the local network, no internet required. And yes, I have done this. Living in a hurricane zone, I test for the internet being out.

@C_I wrote:


And once you connect to their Internet network, then you can connect to any server such as Plex 

Straw man again; I'm not talking about using the internet. I'm specifically referring to NOT connecting to the internet at all. In my scenario, the internet is not required. To quote myself, "Everything you say about the internet is off topic."

@C_I wrote:


or Roku Media Player.

Wrong. Roku Media Player is not a server that you connect to. It is a client application, that does the connecting. In fact, except in the case of a VPN, the Roku Media Player would not be able to connect across the internet.

@C_I wrote:


And, your wireless spectrum wouldn't be saturated if you had high speed Internet, separate from your dedicated wireless spectrum that Direct TV uses.

So, the DirecTV server is its own wireless access point that I don't want or need, but can't shut off (it does have a wired Ethernet jack, btw). The only devices that can connect to it are the DirecTV set top  boxes (STB's). Since my STB's are wired, I don't need the DTV server's access point and would like to shut it off (none of my computers, phones, tablets, or other devices are allowed to use it anyway, by design of DirecTV). Also by DirecTV design, I can't turn it off. Also also by DirecTV design, it's VERY strong. Its signal strength has got to be at or near the legal limit. And it uses multiple channels, so there's lots of crosstalk with my own wireless networks, causing interference and dropouts. So I wrapped my DTV server in aluminum foil and Presto!, my wireless networks are much more reliable.

To be honest, this is also pretty off-topic. Even without the DTV server thrown into the mix, I still have a number of family members who would all like to be streaming on their devices at the same time, each chewing up their own little piece of the wireless pie. Devices that can't move (the soundbar, the remote control hub, the Echo Dot) should not have to be on the wireless net. They're already plugged into the wall for power, another wire is not going to be a problem. Especially since, as you mentioned earlier how good HDMI is (though, in that context, I couldn't figure out why), HDMI has eliminated a whole bunch of wires! Now, instead of 3 cables for YPbPr video and 2 for audio (or 1, if it's an optical cable), there's just the one that carries both video and audio, including a return channel (which, pre-HDMI, was yet another 2 cables). So yeah, with 4 cables per video source eliminated, 1 added back for the soundbar would not be an issue.

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rowkoo1234
Level 9

Re: Smart Sound Bar

@C_I wrote:
     And the link you provided is for  the Roku Media player-but the way you connect to your Roku player is through the Internet. And it requires the Internet to operate.

The Roku does not require the internet to operate. Both my Roku3 and Roku Ultra work just fine without the internet. Yes, I've tested it by unplugging the internet modem. The Roku Media Player DLNA "channel" link I provided is a client app specifically for playing media stored on your local network and does not require an internet connection.

@C_I wrote:


And yes, you can take it to a hotel, and hook it into their TV, but when you set it up, it still searches for a network to connect to.

I normally take Roku sticks to hotels which, given how mobile they are, are necessarily wireless. They're too small to have an Ethernet jack and I wouldn't want or need them to.

And yes, the Roku sticks and the Roku 3 and Roku Ultra support and can search for wireless networks, but the R3 and RU, if you've got them plugged into the wired net, they'll get assigned an IP address from the router and will be on the physical network, no wireless needed. They can check to see if they have internet access, but if they don't, the Media Player will still be able to find and access any and all DLNA servers on the local network, no internet required. And yes, I have done this. Living in a hurricane zone, I test for the internet being out.

@C_I wrote:


And once you connect to their Internet network, then you can connect to any server such as Plex 

Straw man again; I'm not talking about using the internet. I'm specifically referring to NOT connecting to the internet at all. In my scenario, the internet is not required. To quote myself, "Everything you say about the internet is off topic."

@C_I wrote:


or Roku Media Player.

Wrong. Roku Media Player is not a server that you connect to. It is a client application, that does the connecting. In fact, except in the case of a VPN, the Roku Media Player would not be able to connect across the internet.

@C_I wrote:


And, your wireless spectrum wouldn't be saturated if you had high speed Internet, separate from your dedicated wireless spectrum that Direct TV uses.

So, the DirecTV server is its own wireless access point that I don't want or need, but can't shut off (it does have a wired Ethernet jack, btw). The only devices that can connect to it are the DirecTV set top  boxes (STB's). Since my STB's are wired, I don't need the DTV server's access point and would like to shut it off (none of my computers, phones, tablets, or other devices are allowed to use it anyway, by design of DirecTV). Also by DirecTV design, I can't turn it off. Also also by DirecTV design, it's VERY strong. Its signal strength has got to be at or near the legal limit. And it uses multiple channels, so there's lots of crosstalk with my own wireless networks, causing interference and dropouts. So I wrapped my DTV server in aluminum foil and Presto!, my wireless networks are much more reliable.

To be honest, this is also pretty off-topic. Even without the DTV server thrown into the mix, I still have a number of family members who would all like to be streaming on their devices at the same time, each chewing up their own little piece of the wireless pie. Devices that can't move (the soundbar, the remote control hub, the Echo Dot) should not have to be on the wireless net. They're already plugged into the wall for power, another wire is not going to be a problem. Especially since, as you mentioned earlier how good HDMI is (though, in that context, I couldn't figure out why), HDMI has eliminated a whole bunch of wires! Now, instead of 3 cables for YPbPr video and 2 for audio (or 1, if it's an optical cable), there's just the one that carries both video and audio, including a return channel (which, pre-HDMI, was yet another 2 cables). So yeah, with 4 cables per video source eliminated, 1 added back for the soundbar would not be an issue.


 

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cory_booth
Level 8

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

Some of us run a slightly different setup....

All my TV's have an Ethernet port - and I purposely put 4x Ethernet at each TV location

IMG_0010.jpg

cory_booth
Level 8

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

IMG_0010.jpg

I realize I am unique, but I built my house specifically to leverage Ethernet at it's maximum capability.

As many have said, a stationary object is preferred to use hard-wired - when possible.

So, yes, being an avid Roku customer (think I have bought over 20 device over the years), my house is designed to have Ethernet at every TV location (x4 for TV, game consoles, etc...)....

Any device I buy related to TV, desktop PC, gaming console (including Switches, Xboxes, etc..) all are hard-wired

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order


@cory_booth wrote:

IMG_0010.jpg

I realize I am unique, but I built my house specifically to leverage Ethernet at it's maximum capability.

As many have said, a stationary object is preferred to use hard-wired - when possible.

So, yes, being an avid Roku customer (think I have bought over 20 device over the years), my house is designed to have Ethernet at every TV location (x4 for TV, game consoles, etc...)....

Any device I buy related to TV, desktop PC, gaming console (including Switches, Xboxes, etc..) all are hard-wired


        Then you are a minority today. Back in the early 2000's before home networking came to be, and you literally had to set up a LAN in your house using Windows NT,  Ethernet connections were how you had to connect to broadband Internet services through your cable company before the days of high speed broadband Internet.  So the coaxial cable would go in from your cable box and into your cable modem. Then there was the Ethernet cable that went in from the Ethernet port on your cable modem into the Ethernet port in your computer's Ethernet port. Today, desktops, printers, game consoles , etc can be connected wirelessly through your home's wireless network. I'm curious about the band with  when all of your  hardwired devices are all operating at the same time. Is it faster or slower? Is your TV signal just as good with an Ethernet cable instead of an HDMI? I would think you get an SD picture with an Ethernet cable versus a pure HD picture with an HDMI cable. And apparently in Windows you can specify your network as WiFi or Ethernet, but Roku will look for a network address. And at least with my Roku device, a 2018 Roku Express +, there is no Ethernet port. So even if I wanted to connect my Roku with an Ethernet cable, I can't. 

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order


@cory_booth wrote:

IMG_0010.jpg

As many have said, a stationary object is preferred to use hard-wired - when possible.

 If this were 20 plus years ago, I would agree with you. But, today, given the advanced technologies out there, I no longer agree with that statement. Plus, unless you build a computer or get it second hand, you can't get a computer with a communication port or a dial up modem, a serial port for your monitor input or a printer port to connect your printer by hard wire. Today, there are USB ports so all you need are USB cables to connect your monitor, if you have one, or a printer.  There are no printers sold today with a printer port built in to connect it to the printer port your computer. That is unless you buy them second hand. So  the only wires there is are connected to your computer would be a USB cable for your monitor, printer, as well as the power adapters for both. A lot less spaghetti to untangle if the wires become tangled. Within the last year I bought a wireless printer where all that it is hooked to is a USB port on the printer and out to the USB on the back of my computer, plus a power cord. So you can print from your USB connection or your wireless network connection. 

 

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WhiteDragon22
Level 7

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

Also just throwing this out there wifi technology does not support full duplex so it will always be half as fast no matter what.. 

C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order


@WhiteDragon22 wrote:

Also just throwing this out there wifi technology does not support full duplex so it will always be half as fast no matter what.. 


 What do you mean that WiFi technology doesn't support the full duplex?  And, if you are on a private network there isn't as much interference as there is on a public network.  As I said before, old fashioned dial up Internet connections as well as old fashioned regular cable broadband Internet and DSL Internet is half as fast as Ethernet technology.  And unless you've used these technologies, you really don't know slow connections.And,for those who have an HDMI cable hooked into their TV rather than an Ethernet cable, you get a pure HD  picture and the connection is much quicker than an Ethernet cable.  So, as I've also said before, if this were 20 plus years ago, I'd agree with you, but with the advanced technologies out there today, I don't agree with this statement. 

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WhiteDragon22
Level 7

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

Yes, my first modem was 600 baud, I remember waiting an hour just to load a BBS, so yes I am well aware of how far speeds have come. However, the amount of data used has also greatly increased. Twenty years ago no one could believe you would ever need a 1 gig hard drive, and nowadays those are useless. Wifi technology is incapable of running true duplex this is just a fact. This means that it can never be as fast as a wired connection. HDMI and ethernet/wifi are completely different technologies so your comment about HDMI is irrelevant to this conversation. I am a network engineer so believe me when I tell you business will always use ethernet for their critical system, as it will always be faster, more secure, and more reliable than wifi. Now if you want to use wifi and it works for you great! No one is saying you need to stop using it, but if Roku could add an ethernet port alongside the wifi as they do on the Ultra it would not affect you any at all but give those of us who hardwire their entertainment systems a much-needed option.

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