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C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

TV's don't have an Ethernet port to connect it to. Besides, HDMI cables are better. 


@Kevin9 wrote:

Roku seems to be phasing out Ethernet or just forcing customers to pay a premium for units with an Ethernet port either way fans of hardwire lose. Great features on the ultra.  If they were available on the sound bar I’d buy it in a heartbeat, but no Ethernet no sale.


 

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@rowkoo1234 wrote:

@C_I 

It sounds to me like you're equating cable internet access (WAN, to the outside world) with wired Ethernet (LAN, staying inside the house). My wired Ethernet stays up as long as I have power, regardless of whether the cable internet provider goes down. In any event, access to the internet is not what we're talking about - we're talking about hooking the soundbar into our local wired net, which (for some of us) have our own servers.

My wireless net has an Echo Dot and a Harmony remote Hub that are constantly knocking each other off the net. Even when I'm not using it, the light on the Harmony goes red for no reason (no network connection) and the Dot can't stream for more than a couple of minutes before it drops and the Hub goes red. BOTH of these devices are right next to the TV where there's Ethernet for my Roku Ultra. They both have to be plugged into the wall for power, so it's not like I carry them around. THEY BOTH NEED ETHERNET JACKS and NEITHER OF THEM HAS ONE! Both of them would work so much better if they weren't wireless. This isn't to mention my DirecTV server which is its own wireless access point that CAN'T BE SHUT OFF and is as bright as a lighthouse! I literally had to wrap it in aluminum foil so that my wife's work laptop wouldn't keep being kicked of the wireless. I eventually had to run a cable to her laptop so that it would - wait for it - work reliably!

Leave the wireless networks for devices that move: my kids' tablets, my & my wife's phones, our laptops, etc. There's enough stuff chewing up the wireless bandwidth that we don't need to add stationary devices to it as well.

And by the way, my wired Ethernet is 1 Gb, so yeah, even 100Mb wireless doesn't have as much bandwidth.

In short, I'm willing to pay the extra 5 cents it takes for them to add the port. Shoot, I'd even pay an extra dollar. (To be honest, I'd pay an extra $10.)


        TV's don't have Ethernet ports. so there's no way to connect your devices to that.  And, even though my cable Internet was inside, so a LAN, the connection was very unreliable. the Internet that came with U-Verse is more reliable. Yes, there is an Ethernet cable connected to the residential gateway that serves as the wireless router, and that's hooked up to the DVR/ set top box. But, as you know, wireless allows multiple devices to connect to it at once. Ethernet, even though it may be faster, only allows one device to be connected at one time, going back to the early days of the Internet. And as for your wife's laptop being kicked off the wireless network. If you have Windows, you can go to your settings, and make sure that your wife's computer shows up on your network then you can share your wireless connection with your wife's computer.  So there's no need connect your wife's laptop to an Ethernet cable for her to get access to the Internet. But that would only work if your computer's Internet is connected to your Direct TV's wireless access point.  

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@junkboxx wrote:

you win. I have no idea of what I' m talking about. You are going off topic. We explained and you do not like the answer. Discussion over.

This is a discussion group, an open discussion group, so both points of view can be discussed.  And people don't have to like the answers given.  Faster connection speeds does NOT equate to reliability.  Where did I go off topic? Only being connected to the Internet via an Ethernet cable, and I'm not sure what kinds of modems one can just connect just via an Ethernet cable, only allows one device to be connected at a time, or if you have a faster computer,  you can be both online at once but with both computers being on the Internet at one time, the bandwith for both computers will be slower. 


 

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junkboxx
Level 9

Re: Smart Sound Bar

Once again, you show you do not like the answers. Stop your drama.

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rowkoo1234
Level 9

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order


@C_I wrote:

TV's don't have an Ethernet port to connect it to. Besides, HDMI cables are better. 



Well now you're just trolling... Here's the back of a Samsung 65" 4K TV:

TV_Ethernet.png

Note the Ethernet jack circled in red.

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order

@Kevin9 wrote:

Roku seems to be phasing out Ethernet or just forcing customers to pay a premium for units with an Ethernet port either way fans of hardwire lose. Great features on the ultra.  If they were available on the sound bar I’d buy it in a heartbeat, but no Ethernet no sale.

Good. the Ethernet technology is outdated. And hardwiring things has has its limitations. Not mention one of them, is only the device connected can be accessed whereas wireless multiple devices can be accessed at once. If people have problems keeping a wireless connection, check your wireless router in your computer, make sure you have a good signal and if necessary go to Verizon, AT&T and get a portable wireless hotspot device. 


 


 

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Missing Features - Why I canceled my Soundbar Order



@Kevin9 wrote:

Roku seems to be phasing out Ethernet or just forcing customers to pay a premium for units with an Ethernet port either way fans of hardwire lose. Great features on the ultra.  If they were available on the sound bar I’d buy it in a heartbeat, but no Ethernet no sale.


       Good, Ethernet technology is outdated. In the last versions of Windows, there's no backwards compatibility anymore. And the same goes for computers. At one point there used to be a serial port which connected the monitor to the computer and a printer port which connected the printer to the computer. That all changed when USB ports emerged within the last 15-20 years. That's just the nature of the beast. Adapt, change, overcome. Get over it. Hardwiring things has its limitations. One of them is only the device connected can have access to the Internet at one time. Not to mention if there's too many wires, pretty soon they can be like spaghetti and become intertwined, and they can pull out and become disconnected more easily, and you  have to reconnect them. It becomes a pain after awhile. Whereas with wireless, multiple devices can be connected to the Internet at once. And there's no wires to have to reconnect because they don't become disconnected. Now, sometimes depending on where your wireless is located you can have a weak signal, or other times your wireless router may be malfunctioning. But if you get a portable wireless hotspot, that can make up for the weak signal. 


 

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rowkoo1234
Level 9

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@C_I wrote:


        TV's don't have Ethernet ports. so there's no way to connect your devices to that. 

Addressed in an earlier response where I provided a picture of a 65" Samsung 4K TV with an Ethernet jack. And yeah, there's no way to connect my devices to it, but there's no way to connect appliances to my toaster, and they still get power.

@C_I wrote:


And, even though my cable Internet was inside, so a LAN, 


Bringing your cable internet "inside" doesn't make it a LAN (compare: LAN vs WAN). The physical cable run inside your house can't be used by any of the devices on your network except for the cable modem. This device converts it into Ethernet - often one port, but if it's fancy, multiple. Into one of these ports can be plugged a switch which adds additional Ethernet ports to support additional devices.

Some of us have Ethernet cable runs to the various rooms of our houses, which can then themselves have switches. From my cable modem, I have a switch for my desk computer and for the other rooms of the house. In my bedroom, plugged into the Ethernet wall jack, I have another switch for all of the devices connected there (the TV, the Lutron hub, (the Roku soundbar, hint, hint), the satellite receiver). In my family room, I have another switch where more stuff is plugged in (again, a TV, a Roku Ultra, the satellite receiver and also, here's where I would prefer to plug in the Harmony Hub and Echo Dot).

 

@C_I wrote:


[...] the connection was very unreliable. the Internet that came with U-Verse is more reliable. 


Sad as that may be, here again, you're referring to the connection of a device inside the house to a connection outside of it, the WAN. I'm referring to the interconnection of devices, all of which are inside my house - the LAN. Internet connectivity is immaterial in this context.

@C_I wrote:


Yes, there is an Ethernet cable connected to the residential gateway that serves as the wireless router, and that's hooked up to the DVR/ set top box. But, as you know, wireless allows multiple devices to connect to it at once. Ethernet, even though it may be faster, only allows one device to be connected at one time, going back to the early days of the Internet.  


And this may be your opportunity for learning: the trick is to make the "one device" that you plug into your residential gateway a switch that turns that one plug into 4 (or 8 or 20 or 40). Into each one of which you can plug in yet another switch, and another, and another, ad infinitum, ad nauseam. This is, indeed, what the internet is: a collection of devices connected via Ethernet switches (and routers). If the internet only allowed one device to be connected at a time, what was it connected to? Indeed, "inter-net" means "interconnections between networks", so 1 local collection of devices connected to other collections of devices.

@C_I wrote:


And as for your wife's laptop being kicked off the wireless network. If you have Windows, you can go to your settings, and make sure that your wife's computer shows up on your network then you can share your wireless connection with your wife's computer.  


My wife's laptop was on the wireless network, but she was so close to the DirecTV server that it's overpowering signal kept interrupting her service, even though they were on different channels.

@C_I wrote:


So there's no need connect your wife's laptop to an Ethernet cable for her to get access to the Internet. But that would only work if your computer's Internet is connected to your Direct TV's wireless access point.  


The DirecTV's access point is only for the satellite receivers and is not available for other devices. And since (surprise) my satellite receivers are wired, I don't need the DirecTV wireless connectivity, but, even according to its technical manual, there's no way to disable it.

If it seems I'm being pedantic about all of this, it's because of your troll-level conflagration of networking terms. If you're genuinely interesting in learning more about networking, I hope I've helped.

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C_I
Level 12

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@rowkoo1234 wrote:

@C_I wrote:


        TV's don't have Ethernet ports. so there's no way to connect your devices to that. 

Addressed in an earlier response where I provided a picture of a 65" Samsung 4K TV with an Ethernet jack. And yeah, there's no way to connect my devices to it, but there's no way to connect appliances to my toaster, and they still get power.

@C_I wrote:


And, even though my cable Internet was inside, so a LAN, 


Bringing your cable internet "inside" doesn't make it a LAN (compare: LAN vs WAN). The physical cable run inside your house can't be used by any of the devices on your network except for the cable modem. This device converts it into Ethernet - often one port, but if it's fancy, multiple. Into one of these ports can be plugged a switch which adds additional Ethernet ports to support additional devices.

Some of us have Ethernet cable runs to the various rooms of our houses, which can then themselves have switches. From my cable modem, I have a switch for my desk computer and for the other rooms of the house. In my bedroom, plugged into the Ethernet wall jack, I have another switch for all of the devices connected there (the TV, the Lutron hub, (the Roku soundbar, hint, hint), the satellite receiver). In my family room, I have another switch where more stuff is plugged in (again, a TV, a Roku Ultra, the satellite receiver and also, here's where I would prefer to plug in the Harmony Hub and Echo Dot).

 

@C_I wrote:


[...] the connection was very unreliable. the Internet that came with U-Verse is more reliable. 


Sad as that may be, here again, you're referring to the connection of a device inside the house to a connection outside of it, the WAN. I'm referring to the interconnection of devices, all of which are inside my house - the LAN. Internet connectivity is immaterial in this context.

@C_I wrote:


Yes, there is an Ethernet cable connected to the residential gateway that serves as the wireless router, and that's hooked up to the DVR/ set top box. But, as you know, wireless allows multiple devices to connect to it at once. Ethernet, even though it may be faster, only allows one device to be connected at one time, going back to the early days of the Internet.  


And this may be your opportunity for learning: the trick is to make the "one device" that you plug into your residential gateway a switch that turns that one plug into 4 (or 8 or 20 or 40). Into each one of which you can plug in yet another switch, and another, and another, ad infinitum, ad nauseam. This is, indeed, what the internet is: a collection of devices connected via Ethernet switches (and routers). If the internet only allowed one device to be connected at a time, what was it connected to? Indeed, "inter-net" means "interconnections between networks", so 1 local collection of devices connected to other collections of devices.

@C_I wrote:


And as for your wife's laptop being kicked off the wireless network. If you have Windows, you can go to your settings, and make sure that your wife's computer shows up on your network then you can share your wireless connection with your wife's computer.  


My wife's laptop was on the wireless network, but she was so close to the DirecTV server that it's overpowering signal kept interrupting her service, even though they were on different channels.

@C_I wrote:


So there's no need connect your wife's laptop to an Ethernet cable for her to get access to the Internet. But that would only work if your computer's Internet is connected to your Direct TV's wireless access point.  


The DirecTV's access point is only for the satellite receivers and is not available for other devices. And since (surprise) my satellite receivers are wired, I don't need the DirecTV wireless connectivity, but, even according to its technical manual, there's no way to disable it.

If it seems I'm being pedantic about all of this, it's because of your troll-level conflagration of networking terms. If you're genuinely interesting in learning more about networking, I hope I've helped.


       I understand what the Internet is- but- Ethernet connections are NOT necessary for modern Internet connections. Why? because most Internet connections today are wireless. At one time,  you could get a cable modem. One connection was connected from the Ethernet port on the back of your computer and it connected to the Ethernet port in the back of your set top box. Then you had an adapter port that connected to the wall. But the problem with that was when the power went out or the cable went out, so did your Internet. Sometimes cable Internet went out even though the cable TV did not. The reason for that was the bandwith was so low. Also, you could at one time get a DSL modem which required you to make connections to you your landline which connected to the DSL modem and there was an Ethernet port on the modem which hooked into your computer and a power adapter which connected to the wall. And the other thing is even with Direct TV- you can get AT&T high speed Internet that comes with a wireless network, so you don't have to try to connect your wife's computer an Ethernet cable, and that way it wouldn't interrupt your Direct TV service.  And AT&T offers bundles where you can bundle your cell phone, your Direct TV and your high speed Internet. 

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rowkoo1234
Level 9

Re: Smart Sound Bar


@C_I wrote:

Ethernet connections are NOT necessary for modern Internet connections.

Straw man - I never said they were. I said they were preferable in certain circumstances where mobility is not a necessity.

@C_I wrote:

Why? [... a whole bunch of stuff supporting the straw man that we're not talking about ...]

 


@C_I wrote:

Sometimes cable Internet went out even though the cable TV did not. The reason for that was the bandwith was so low.  

No. It's because they were separate systems. They ran at different frequencies and didn't share bandwidth.


cable-stream.png


@C_I wrote:

[...more support / counter-arguments regarding the straw man...]

@C_I wrote:

you can get AT&T high speed Internet


Again, we're not talking about a connection to the internet, we're talking about connections to our internal network. Roku can connect to DLNA servers on your local network. I can take my cable modem out of my house, I can cancel my subscription to my internet provider, and I can still use the Roku to connect to my server to watch my home movies and listen to my music. Everything you say about the internet is off topic.

My point is: my wireless spectrum is saturated, a wired connection will help me. If Roku wants my money, they'll provide a wired solution. If they don't want it, that's their choice.

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