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jeffrok
Level 12

Re: The Argument For Over Buying/Using Separate Devices Over Fully Integrated Smart TVs

My problem with my TCL Roku TV is that it's a 2 year old model that operates more slowly than my 7 year old Roku 3. The Roku 3 runs circles around it in startup, navigation, and streaming "ramp-up".. 

An all-in-one Roku TV solution from 2017 should not run like a product made in 2012. Now that TV has a Fire Stick attached and doing most of the streaming.

Yeah, I got some Rokus.
https://youtu.be/d1CSEeqWl10
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Wanderlust
Level 8

Re: The Argument For Over Buying/Using Separate Devices Over Fully Integrated Smart TVs


@JMM1 wrote:

There's another argument against Smart TV's in this recent article, Smart TV Privacy Risks.

"Cyber security experts and consumer advocates have warned about privacy risks involved in smart TVs for a few years, but now the FBI is putting consumers on alert as well. An FBI office in Oregon urged shoppers ahead of the holiday shopping weekend to build up a “digital defense” against their smart TV."

There are certainly dangers in any technology we bring into our home. Right now, I feel somewhat secure with the Roku and I hope it stays that way. My beautiful Samsung Smart TV only gets connected to the internet, with an ethernet cable, about once a month to check for an update.


I'm new to smart tvs.  If you only connect it to the internet about once a month, then you don't use it for anything but local channels?  You don't watch anything else?  I thought the main danger for smart tvs was them taking over your camera (mine doesn't have one).  Are there other things?  Can you watch non local channels with out being connected to the net?  

Thanks for helping a newbie.

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atc98092
Level 17

Re: The Argument For Over Buying/Using Separate Devices Over Fully Integrated Smart TVs


@Wanderlust wrote:


I'm new to smart tvs.  If you only connect it to the internet about once a month, then you don't use it for anything but local channels?  You don't watch anything else?  I thought the main danger for smart tvs was them taking over your camera (mine doesn't have one).  Are there other things?  Can you watch non local channels with out being connected to the net?  


The major danger is a camera and/or microphone installed in the TV. There are quite a number with mics that don't have cameras. However, most often the mic is on the remote and requires pressing a button to activate it. That's how Roku devices with a mic work. Could the mic actually be activated and listening without pressing a button? Certainly, but I doubt any major manufacturer would intentionally do so without the purchaser knowing about it. That would be a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Besides actually listening/watching your room, a Smart TV could also be tracking what you're watching, either online or Over the Air (OTA). Naturally, even without a Smart TV there are ways to see where you are going on the Internet. Your ISP maintains logs of all activity across your connection, but again it's unlikely a major ISP is doing something unscrupulous with the data. They most likely have a privacy policy you can review on their web site. That also means that it doesn't have to be a Smart TV, as that same ISP log will record your activity from a computer or any other device connected to the Internet. 

Can you watch anything other than local channels without being connected to the Internet? No.  OTA TV requires being within line of sight of the TV transmitter antenna, as well as within a distance that provides an adequate signal. For broadcast TV, that usually means being within 50 miles of the antenna, depending on the height of the antenna at both the transmitter and your home. I can receive a station close to 90 miles away, but that's because the transmitter is on a mountain and my home is significantly higher than the surrounding terrain. I also have a large antenna to capture weaker signals. But can I watch stations in Portland Oregon (I'm just south of Seattle)? Not a chance. Even with an Internet connection you generally can't watch a OTA TV station on another city because they don't offer a stream. There is one exception with a channel called Locast, which offers OTA stations within certain geographic areas over the Internet. However, their terms of licensing says you are only supposed to use it to watch the stations in your geographical area. For me, there are a couple of local stations that I have problems with, and Locast lets me see them perfectly. 

Bottom line: you are in little danger of being hacked if your TV is rarely connected to the Internet. 

Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Ultra (4670), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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JMM1
Level 10

Re: The Argument For Over Buying/Using Separate Devices Over Fully Integrated Smart TVs


@Wanderlust wrote:

@JMM1 wrote:

There's another argument against Smart TV's in this recent article, Smart TV Privacy Risks.

"Cyber security experts and consumer advocates have warned about privacy risks involved in smart TVs for a few years, but now the FBI is putting consumers on alert as well. An FBI office in Oregon urged shoppers ahead of the holiday shopping weekend to build up a “digital defense” against their smart TV."

There are certainly dangers in any technology we bring into our home. Right now, I feel somewhat secure with the Roku and I hope it stays that way. My beautiful Samsung Smart TV only gets connected to the internet, with an ethernet cable, about once a month to check for an update.


I'm new to smart tvs.  If you only connect it to the internet about once a month, then you don't use it for anything but local channels?  You don't watch anything else?  I thought the main danger for smart tvs was them taking over your camera (mine doesn't have one).  Are there other things?  Can you watch non local channels with out being connected to the net?  

Thanks for helping a newbie.


I agree with everything ATC wrote.

If you're not going to use the apps on the Smart TV there is no reason keep it connected to the internet. Your TV will work fine watching OTA channels with an antenna and a Roku. Just connect it once a month or so to check for an update to the TV's software.

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ronfelder
Level 8

Re: The Argument For Over Buying/Using Separate Devices Over Fully Integrated Smart TVs

Maybe your Roku didn't fail but as what happened in December many of them where made useless for Netflix for they could no longer support the latest version of Netflix. I'll stick with stand alone [pieces. If they only sell smart tv's i just won't use that function.

Roku 2xs (3100x), Roku Express (3900x) ,Roku Ultra (4660RW) .FIOS Quantum modem router, Verizon FIOS 100/100, LG HDTV 42LH90, Pioneer VSX-920 Audio/Video Multi Channel Receiver
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