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Level 7

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

i think that cable/sat programmers need to realize we'd be glad to pay, as with Netflix we
and hulu..but we shouldn't be asked to be redundant..its one or the other..they need to get into the 21st century
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Level 7

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

Let's not forget two things:

  1. If they didn't show those apps (Nat Geo, Discovery, etc), how would a subscriber to those, be able to watch them on the Rokukoo?
  2. You can set up your own home page of items that you do have access to watching.....
  3. See #1 and #2.
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Level 10

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

We cut cable. Went to Antenna and a Tablo unit for OTA DVR capabilities (we rarely watch anything but the news live)

Added Philo as streaming app on Roku to fill in all the Viacom channels we actually used to watch on cable (HGTV, DIY, Food, History, Travel, etc) for $20 a month and they include a cloud DVR functionality.

We had Prime, Netflix and something else before we cut cable TV off, but we're still saving over $100 a month. Not too shabby.

 

Chief Technology Officer, Barge Captain/mechanic/deckhand/dock hand, Cook, Lawn care and vehicle maintenance.
Yep.... I'm retired. :D
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Level 12

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

Actually I see the Streaming World (this includes Roku as well as the other Big 3 players-Android/Chromecast, Amazon, Apple) as simply an alternative or supplement  to traditional pay-for-content cable and even regular old fashioned free OTA traditional broadcast tv.  Nothing more.

The many people preconditioned to paying for content presented by traditional cable  might somewhat mimic the cable experience by blindly paying for content whenever it is requested to whip out your credit card and/or subscription and sign in.  But only to a point.  It does take time to learn a new way of thinking or doing things like everything else in life.

Look at it another way.  People are streaming away (no pun intended) from paying for content with those same cable companies month after month.  Why?  They can't afford it anymore!  

I don't really care anymore how much cable or another company hustles the streaming crowd and even try to at times trick them with sneaky pay up/sign up now pop-ups in the most poorly timed (for the viewer at least) part of the program's story line.  Most of the cord cutter crowd might (just might) go for one or two pay streaming channel apps up front.  But that's all. They are either maxed or completely tapped out or fast approaching some sort of insolvency. 

I pay only for one app-CBS All Access-after several months of sticking to the freebies only during my own year long experiment.  When I signed up for it, I made sure it was suited for the slower broadband I have where I live and most of all, most of the new and classic content I want to see for a year.  If someone else asks me for a subscription or money up front, bye!  Most people have been rather spoiled or conditioned to pay,, pay and pay more.  Their bank accounts say otherwise.

If you use your streaming device as an tool to help protect your grpwing limited monthly money allotment, it works well.  If you start to fall for all those puppy eye pay up requests, you rejoined traditional cable!

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Level 11

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:


@nocable wrote:
Nat Geo Wild was the reason I finally cut cable TV. They had it on the lower tier package, and I watched it a lot. But then, it was moved to a higher tier, which mean even more money paid for bundles with channels I won't watch. And tha, was the straw that broke the camel's back, as they say. Been cable TV free for over 2 years now. I'm learning, over time, to be satisfied with what I get over YouTube and Pluto.

And, of course, amazingly, Nat Geo Wild has never shown up to be one of the channels available to choose in the cable company's $20/month "Build Your Own Package" offerings. Smiley Indifferent

Just fyi, according to https://www.suppose.tv/tv?m=78&f=1l78l288l250l50l1l1lll1&r=B1yFg1mnS , Nat Geo Wild is available from Sling with a $30/mo 46 channel bundle.

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Level 8

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

Ok.  I would advise anyone with cable or Dish TV buying a Roku not to drop the other service immediately.  I kept my Dish for about 6 months and eased into it.  After that time, I was barely using Dish anymore, was used to the Roku and finally cancelled Dish.  As others have said, you can subscribe to a streaming service.  I use Philo ($20 a month vs $90 for Dish).  Advantage is no contracts, you can pick up or cancel at any time.  Also, way cheaper.  You can get History channel on Philo and I think Disney has NatGeo.  Yeah, you can subscribe to as many as you like, or none.  Roku has so much more content than cable, most of it free, that you may not even miss History.  Check out cordcuttersnews.com for more help.

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Level 7

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

Here's the thing: We should be able to have Roku as our provider and be able to pay for subscription channels al a carte. I would like to be able to get CBSSports channel on Roku, but evidently that's not happening without a "provider." That mean Roku should be working with such providers to enable al a carte with them. Otherwise the full potential of Roku is not being met.

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Level 8

Re: Cable-cutters be advised:

Well, it's not like Roku advertised their product with a "Buy this and you can get cable channels for FREE!!!"  When I first bought a Roku a few years ago, I saw the History channel and even signed in with my Dish account.  Big deal.  All they had was VOD and not that much of it; it wasn't live.  It's not that annoying.  You click these channels once, see you can't watch them, and move on.  Calm down and don't give yourself a heart attack.  As for watching on the internet, yeah, you can do that.  Or plug in the HDMI cable or cast to TV, whatever.  Roku is just a lot easier.  Turn on the big screen TV, there's the Home page, and find your channel.  Way easier than hunting the net.  Unless you watch YouTube.  My old man, that's all he watches.  Even when he's on the big TV.  Roku Home Page, YouTube.  I've saved a ton of money dropping Dish.  I subscribe to $6 a month Hulu. Ads are 90 seconds long.  They have a lot of VOD cable channels, including History.  There is so much free stuff on Roku that you probably don't need much else.

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