Community Discussions

Connect with other Roku users to learn more about streaming, cord-cutting, finding your favorite content, or talk about the latest entertainment happenings. It's all on Roku!
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted

Cable Costs vs. Streaming services

i received a message from roku to how to make roku better ...free access to cbs fox nbc ..these should be free....now on the prices of sling, youtube, tv, ect , we pay for the internet ..that can be priced anywhere between 60.00 to 130.00 without the cost of tv and movies ect ..now these other offer on roku go between 45.00 and 75 .00 dollar ..add it all together and you get the same price as having full cable ..so whats the difference ...yes roku offers free movies ..but they dont change to much and dont have tv in your area..and the others you can get on roku by paying for them ..one by one.cost almost the same as full cable ..so whats the point of cutting cable when you add up all the channels a person wants by paying for each one ..im thinking about going back to full cable its cheaper then paying for what a i wants to add to roku....

18 Replies
Highlighted
Level 16

Re: email i received

You dont need to subscribe to every Premium Channel.

There is plenty of free content on free channels.

I subscribe to SlingTV blue and thats it.

I have thought of switching to another but Two would be

expensive and redundant.

Philo is 20 bucks I think .

Roku Ultra ---Ethernet rules---

From now on if people dont upvote me and do as I say I will consider holding my breath and selling my Roku's.
Highlighted
Level 10

Re: email i received

Our cable provider (Spectrum/Charter) offers a couple of streaming packages for $25. Add Cloud DVR for another $5. Still a TON cheaper than full blown cable TV and you get your locals plus channels you probably actually watch(ed) on cable TV (for us that's channels like HGTV, DIY, Food, Discovery, TLC, etc). Depends on which streaming package you choose. No truck roll. No cable box. You run the Spectrum TV app on Roku and you see whatever channels you're package has you subscribed to.

Also a great alternative to renting yet another cable box for each extra TV if you already have cable TV.

 

Chief Technology Officer, Barge Captain/mechanic/deckhand/dock hand, Cook, Lawn care and vehicle maintenance.
Yep.... I'm retired. :D
0 Kudos
Highlighted

Re: email i received

did anyone read the fine print on these services...all i no it would be cheaper here if i went back to cable ,,and sling you only get the package for the first month or two ..then it goes up ..thats what i read on the fine print 

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Level 16

Re: email i received

I've been paying like 25 bucks for Sling Blue for years.

There is plenty of Free content on Roku that I like to watch. Plenty.

I have many friends with Cable. So I can compare.

Its not even about saving money anymore. Cable is constantly trying to suck more money out of your pocket.And MUCH of what they offer to watch is simply repeated on another Channel.

Depends on personal preference in and what you want t watch I suppose.

Its your decision.

Roku Ultra ---Ethernet rules---

From now on if people dont upvote me and do as I say I will consider holding my breath and selling my Roku's.
Highlighted
Level 11

Re: email i received

Agree as far as making your own decisions when it comes to your entertainment budget.  I once considered cable as an only option several years ago.  I streamed on my laptop only for viewing already broadcast content I missed from ABC, NBC, FOX, and somewhat CBS.  Then my Epiphany Moment happened.

Upgrading my television to an HMDI one allowed me to experiment further with streaming devices connected to it.  And the rest is history as far as I'm concerned.  Buying 2 types of devices (Chromecast AND Roku), getting used to apps as channels, and going back to presently using a simple antenna for immediate OTA broadcasting options not only saves me much money per month, but unimaginable flexibility as well.

My TV Done My Way.  Minimal expense with only 1 paid app (CBS All Access) and the rest free w/ads and library streaming services (Kanopy & Hoopla).  That was my decision.  You must choose your own way.

Highlighted
Level 10

Re: email i received


@MatthewMasse1 wrote:

i received a message from roku to how to make roku better ...free access to cbs fox nbc ..these should be free....now on the prices of sling, youtube, tv, ect , we pay for the internet ..that can be priced anywhere between 60.00 to 130.00 without the cost of tv and movies ect ..now these other offer on roku go between 45.00 and 75 .00 dollar ..add it all together and you get the same price as having full cable ..so whats the difference ...yes roku offers free movies ..but they dont change to much and dont have tv in your area..and the others you can get on roku by paying for them ..one by one.cost almost the same as full cable ..so whats the point of cutting cable when you add up all the channels a person wants by paying for each one ..im thinking about going back to full cable its cheaper then paying for what a i wants to add to roku....



@MatthewMasse1 wrote:

did anyone read the fine print on these services...all i no it would be cheaper here if i went back to cable ,,and sling you only get the package for the first month or two ..then it goes up ..thats what i read on the fine print 


You're already paying, and will continue to pay for internet, no matter what, right?  So that can't be included in the cost of your streaming TV service(s).

Exactly how many channels do you watch of the cable TV package you're talking about going back to, and at what monthly cost?

It all depends on what content you want, too.  ESPN, Fox Sports, etc., are expensive to have.

Here is my current setup:

$16 Philo (Legacy Plan; $20 New Subscribers) (45 Channels, 3 Streams, DVR)
$5.99 Hulu (2 Streams)
$12.99 Netflix (2 Streams)
$0 Prime Video (Included W/Prime) (3 Streams)
$14.99 Independent Cable "Local+" Package (Incl $10/mo 2 Services Discount) (43 Channels, 4 Streams, DVR)
$0 Pluto TV (∞ Streams)
$0 Crackle (∞ Streams)
$0 Tubi TV (∞ Streams)
$0 Many Other Apps/Channels With Free Content (∞ Streams)
$0 Roku Channel (∞ Streams)
---------
$49.97/mo
 
As already mentioned above, if Sling offers the content you want, Sling Blue is $25, Sling Orange is $25 and Sling Orange+Sling Blue is $40...REGULAR PRICE!
 

What fine print?  Apparently you've found some fine print that nobody else can see, so please elaborate.

Unless you're referring to one of the two Spectrum streaming packages, also mentioned above, which are a really good value for those in a Spectrum service area looking to reduce their TV programming cost, I'd like to know what cable TV subscription package is a better value than Sling or something like the combo I outlined above.

If my current $14.99 Independent Cable "Local+" Package (Incl $10/mo 2 Services Discount) (43 Channels, 4 Streams, DVR) increases in price too much in the future, I'll definitely consider getting an attic antenna and a live OTA TV DVR system, but as of now it's a great value, and I'll keep it while it lasts.

 

Highlighted
Level 10

Re: email i received

The following tongue-in-cheek article made me think about @MatthewMasse1 's attitude in this thread!


techhive.com/article/3441917/the-cost-of-all-these-streaming-services-adds-up.html wrote:
Gee, the cost of all these streaming services sure adds up!

How to cut the cord and get everything—and I mean everything—you could possibly want.

When I was a younger man, cutting the cord on cable TV was so easy. All you had to do was pay for Netflix, and you could watch practically every movie and TV show that ever existed.

As lots of other pundits have pointed out, it’s not so simple anymore. With every major tech company, media conglomerate, and telecom provider trying to grab a slice of that sweet streaming business, getting sufficient audiovisual stimulation at a reasonable price has become pretty much impossible. And trust me, as someone who’s covered cord-cutting for about five years now, I really did the math on this.

Not just Netflix anymore - Let’s start with the basics. Like most Americans, I’m already getting Netflix for $13 per month, and I’ll continue to do so even though it’s losing a bunch of valuable content (Friends! The Office!) to TV networks that now want to launch their own services. And because a trip to the store for the kiddo’s pull-ups is too much effort, I’m getting Amazon Prime Video as part of my $120-per-year Prime subscription. I’m also interested in Hulu at $6 per month—actually $12 per month, because I hate watching ads—to fill in some of those network shows that Netflix is now missing, plus Disney+ at another $7 per month to get back the Marvel films that are leaving Netflix. I don’t want to watch ads on YouTube, either, so let’s budget another $12 per month for YouTube Premium. (I wasn’t willing to go without Cobra Kai anyway.)

Why stop there, though? I’ve got see what old Jean-Luc Picard is up to these days, so of course I’m going to pay $6 per month for CBS All Access—actually, $10 per month, per the whole ad aversion thing—in anticipation of watching Star Trek: Picard in 2020. And although Game of Thrones is over, I might as well keep paying $15 per month for HBO Now on the off-chance that I’ll need a refresher. Maybe someday I’ll even get around to watching Barry.

As long as we’re talking premium channels, I’ve been meaning to see what Ray Donovan is all about—Liev Schreiber seems so serious about whatever it is he’s doing in all those promo shots—so let’s throw in another $11 per month for Showtime. Starz is also putting out good stuff these days with shows like Power, so that’s another $9 per month, and I don’t want to miss Epix’s foray into original content either, so count me in for $6 per month there. To be clear, I definitely paid for all of these channels as part of a cable package back in the day.

Rebuilding the bundle - Speaking of cable, I’m already closing in on $100 per month, which is the average price people pay for traditional TV packages, and I haven’t even started trying to replicate my old channel bundle, which I absolutely refuse to give up or scale back on. The Elite package on PlayStation Vue should do the trick; at $65 per month, it has practically every cable channel you can think of.

Well, not every channel. I’ve still got to watch NFL Redzone during football season, so that’s another $10 per month for Vue’s Sports Pack add-on. And because Sony dropped Viacom channels a few years ago, I’ll need to subscribe to Philo for another $20 per month so the kids can watch Nick Jr. (If I’m going to be spoiled for TV options, so should they.)

Have I mentioned yet that I’m a sports fan? Not even ESPN’s half-dozen cable channels are enough for me, so naturally I’m on board for ESPN+ at $6 per month. It’s got every Major League Soccer game, a whole bunch of boxing and UFC matches, scintillating originals such as Payton Manning telling you how other quarterbacks screwed up, and a backlog of weird college sports like squash. What more could you want?

A lot more, actually. ESPN+’s MLS coverage alone doesn’t satisfy my soccer hunger, so I’ll be subscribing to NBC Sports League Pass at $65 per season for Premiere League matches, Fox Soccer Match Pass at $20 per month for Bundesliga, and B/R Live at $10 per month for Champions League and Europa. Don’t forget MLB TV ($115 per season), NHL TV ($145 per season), and NBA League Pass ($200 per season) for out-of-market coverage of those leagues. I can’t get enough of dudes punching each other in the face either, so I’ll be paying $20 per month to get even more in the zone on boxing and mixed martial arts with DAZN. (You can tell that I’ve thoroughly researched my cord-cutting options because I know how to pronounce “DAZN.” Incidentally, let’s budget another $10 per month for every time I crave a calzone.)

Even more add-ons - All that punching and kicking and sweating that I’ve watched other people do wears me out, though, so I’ve got to balance things out with some sophisticated British programming. Acorn TV and Britbox should do the trick at $6 and $7 per month respectively, but then limiting yourself to one country’s worth of prestige content seems myopic, so I’ll also throw in a Walter Presents subscription for $6 per month. Maybe Walter can help me decide what to watch on all these other subscription plans as well.

After paying for all these options, not supporting public broadcasting seems selfish, so put me down for a $5 per month PBS Passport subscription. I should also show my kids’ support with a $5 per month PBS Kids subscription via Amazon Prime Channels, and maybe throw in even more support with a $6 per month PBS Masterpiece subscription.

Why limit my patronage to PBS, though? I love watching people play video games on Twitch, so I’m going to earmark $50 per month to support my favorite video creators with individual channel subscriptions. Ditto for all my favorite podcasters dropping exclusive videos on Patreon.

Oh, and don’t worry; I didn’t forget about Apple TV+. I can get a year of that for free with a brand-new iPhone 11 Pro Max, which only costs $60 per month on a payment plan. I might not really need a new phone, but my old one doesn’t come in an alluring shade of green.

Adding it all up, it looks like I’ll be spending upwards of $500 a month just for the simple—yet essential—ability to watch everything. Suddenly, cord-cutting doesn’t seem like such a great deal, especially compared to the good ol’ days, when everything was on Netflix.

The hidden cost of cord-cutting - The price of streaming TV alone isn’t the only problem, either. You must also factor in other unforeseen expenses, like the basic nourishment you need while watching every movie, TV show, and sporting event in existence.

With food, as with TV, I must have a taste of everything, so I’ll pay DoorDash $10 per month for fee-free delivery, plus another $10 per month to Uber Eats to cover all the restaurants DoorDash doesn’t work with. I should probably do a little cooking too, so count me in for a $35-per-week Martha & Marley Spoon plan for fancy meals, a $52-per-week Sun Basket subscription for “globally inspired” organic fare, a $12-per-week Purple Carrot subscription for plant-based dining, and a $129-per-month Butcher Box subscription for those times when I just crave a steak. That’s probably enough to make sure I don’t miss out on any flavors, though I should also add a $200-per-quarter luxury wine box to wash it all down, plus a $50-per month luxury watch subscription to keep track of all the time I’ve frittered away in my man cave.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: Does anyone really need more than a handful of these subscription services for entertainment and sustenance?

Just kidding. What you’re actually thinking is: Pretty soon, someone’s going to roll up all these services into one bundle, and it’ll be cable all over again. So true! I’m old enough to remember when one reasonably and transparently priced cable bill got you a near-infinite supply of prestigious original series; round-the-clock access to even the most obscure sporting events; a huge catalog of on-demand feelgood TV shows; all the best programming from overseas; an ever-expanding universe of user-generated content; and enough fancy food, wine, and watches to fill a yacht. If only someone would just throw every service into a one-size-fits-all subscription, life would be so much simpler—especially for me, someone who is willing to pay for all these things.

But as TV service unbundles and expands to cover more content than ever, we’re now supposed to decide for ourselves what to pay for and what to live without, which is clearly a ridiculous concept.

If anyone can think of any other aspect of life in which this logic applies, I’d love to hear it.

And just in case it wasn’t sufficiently over the top, this week’s entire column is a satirical commentary on critics of the cord-cutting movement who are convinced we’ll all rue the day when the cable and satellite TV industry no longer controls television entertainment.


 

Highlighted
Level 8

Re: email i received

I don't think the problem is with Roku but with streaming in general.  Right now there are two services that are complete, i.e. locals, some sports, and some entertainment as well as the regional sports channel, YTTV and Hulu Live.  YTTV does not have the History Channel and HL does not have AMC.  These two channels are in the simplest cable packages.  But if we want them, we have to take a second package, usually Philo, to get one channel, for an extra $20.  Not like I am asking for some exotic or Tier 3 channel.  Our needs are simple.  ESPN 1 and 2, NBCSN, TCM, TNT, AMC, History, Animal Planet, HGTV, ID, Oxygen, USA, Syfy, Discovery and Pop.  15 channels, although more is fine.   We have no problem except with the History / AMC issue.  But we have tons of sports we never watch.  I would rather pay an extra $5 for History than pay $20 for it.

The other issue is also not Roku's fault, but since Sinclair bought the Fox regional sports, they seem to have made sure cable and satellite could get them, but already Fubo and Sling have had to drop them when their contracts ran out.  This is the only way we can see our local basketball, baseball, and hockey teams.  There is no way to buy your regional teams individually.  Your service has to carry it.  The Spectrum streaming program mentioned would be perfect if we were able to pay extra to get the regional sports channel. 

Some of us can't get our locals with an antenna so Sling and Philo are not good options by themselves.  We don't take any niche services but the $8.99 Netflix and we already had Prime.  I don't count these as we would have them anyway.

Highlighted
Level 10

Re: email i received

Yeah, I keep looking at different package options. We currently get locals OTA using a Tablo Quad as a DVR. Added Philo to get the channels we actually WATCHED from cable, and already had Netflix and Prime.

It seems every package you look at is missing ONE channel that's on your "must have" list.

One of the problems with packages that have locals in them is the "carriage fees". Spectrum's $25 a month streaming package tacks on I think $12 in fees. If you want to be able to record shows be ready to pony up another $5 a month for cloud DVR (if it's even available in your area). Now you're at $42 and it's STILL missing DIY channel last I looked and we watch that one a LOT. I haven't looked at YTTV or Fubo in a while to know where their pricing is, but I'm sure it's at least close to that $42 and both of those have some form of DVR built in.

The ADVANTAGE for using streaming services is that you're not getting whacked an additional fee for every TV you have hooked up or paying additional set top box rentals for each one.

Chief Technology Officer, Barge Captain/mechanic/deckhand/dock hand, Cook, Lawn care and vehicle maintenance.
Yep.... I'm retired. :D
0 Kudos