Channel Issues & Questions

Help & troubleshooting for channels on your Roku device, including adding/removing channels, logging in to, authenticating, or activating a channel, channel-specific playback issues, assistance contacting channel publishers to report issues, and adjusting channel-specific settings.
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j_m_
Level 11

Re: HBO Max can be accessed on your ROKU on Hulu

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@shadowplay0918 wrote:

If it's as easy as you say it is to make a cheap box and turn a profit who is no one else doing it?  How's that Boxee Box doing these days?  With regards to TiVo I have probably owned 9-10 of their dvr's in my lifetime but I doubt many would disagree that they are clueless these days as a company.  I wouldn't bet anything on their long term success.

That leaves Amazon and Google, both companies can afford to lose money on their devices but I don't want to be tied to either for my streaming (especially once the competition is gone).  Google was the best browser when there was competition, now I get non-stop ads and promoted results (not to mention no no privacy).  Amazon is no better.

You don't like Roku?  Simple solution is to not use their product and move on.


Already have, as I said. And there are plenty of other Android TV based options and more to come, some cheap, some more pricey (but also a lot more powerful—e.g. the Shield). I get it, you are all “Apple and Google” are big, scary, and evil, while willing to look the other way when poor little Roku blatantly sticks it to its customers with gatekeeping, insulting “solutions,” etc. Enjoy that while it lasts.

adag
Level 7

Re: HBO Max work around

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Thanks for the HBO Max info, but for those of us who are digitally challenged (me!), what do you mean by "cast" to my big screen?  I don't have a Roku Tv, but use the Roku stick.  

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Bored
Level 9

Re: Workaround for HBO Max

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So: not a workaround for HBO Max

DrewNJ
Level 9

Re: Workaround for HBO Max

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@Bored wrote:

So: not a workaround for HBO Max


No, a workaround so you can continue to watch HBO content at least.

bknabe
Level 12

Re: HBO Max can be accessed on your ROKU on Hulu

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Again, to be clear, I do not expect any of this to make you less frustrated over the situation.  I am also extremely frustrated in not getting HBO Max after being banned from HBO Go on Roku.  But it would be nice if you could tone down the one-sided slated perspective of claims Roku is fully at fault.  From where I am sitting, it looks like if AT&T/TW/HBO did what they told the United States Federal Government they would do then we should all have access to HBO Max on Roku right now.

I read most of your reply, and nothing in it surprises me. This is what I have been telling people from the start. Warner (HBO) and Comcast (Peacock) both have histories of abusing their customers - both privacy and actually telling them to shut up and live with it (sometimes literally). It's hard for me to accept they are the good guys in this scenario because they have almost never (please, someone show me a time they have been) the good guys in the past.

 


 

Beeseepee
Level 8

Re: Workaround for HBO Max

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I downloaded Play On desktop to my computer, Play On to my TCL Roku tv, paid a 20 dollar lifetime license fee, and now I have Hbo Max via Play On. Play On is a DVR service utilizing your computer. I did the log-in described and it works. THIS is a workaround for Hbo Max.

DrewNJ
Level 9

Re: Workaround for HBO Max

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@Beeseepee wrote:

I downloaded Play On desktop to my computer, Play On to my TCL Roku tv, paid a 20 dollar lifetime license fee, and now I have Hbo Max via Play On. Play On is a DVR service utilizing your computer. I did the log-in described and it works. THIS is a workaround for Hbo Max.


I’m glad you found a “workaround” that works for you.  For me I always had a computer connected to TV, it was more about convenience and travel.  

My workaround was about restoring a feature that I was promised (as were all of you) when I bought the product.  I actually get it that it won’t always be able to do the newest things.  What upsets me the most is when that product you bought (Roku with HBO), unethically removed a feature (in fact one of the very features you bought it for).  

It’s like getting married, and then 2 years in saying, oh btw this was only temporary.  Well almost, anyway Roku, I hope you get what I mean.

Change terms going forward, don’t remove and make obsolete what I bought you for.

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crboehm
Level 7

Re: HBO Max work around

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If you go to the Roku's settings, there should be a screen mirroring option.  If there is, set to Alert or Always Accept.  If it's not there, your Roku device may not support it.
Then on your phone, when you use the "Smart View" app, your Roku should either alert you to accept the incoming request to screen mirror ("cast"), or if you chose Always Accept it should start loading your phone's screen.  Let it finish loading on your Roku/TV Screen, then launch the HBO Max app and enjoy.

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fluke
Level 13

Re: HBO Max can be accessed on your ROKU on Hulu

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@j_m_ wrote:

@fluke wrote:
Regardless of if you like or dislike Roku Channel as a method to purchase access to premium streaming services, the reality is that it does make Roku a reseller. For purchases outside of the Roku Channel, I agree that Roku does not deserve the subscriber information but I have not ever been pointed to proof that Roku is demanding it for subscribers outside of Roku Channel.

Yes,  but what you are missing is that I and many others simply fundamentally disagree with Roku’s apparent attempt to force AT&T to agree to allow Roku to resell HBO Max by blocking the update of the HBO Now app to HBO Max. These should not be tied together. We bought Roku because it was a neutral platform where we could install apps without gatekeeping. Roku has moved in a different direction. Their choice. But many of us will likewise move to a platform that is more open like Roku once was. Our choice. 

Why don't you contact HBO about releasing HBO Max as simply an update? Multiple apps on Roku have been updated without being blocked. Netflix app looks very different today than it did when the first generation of Roku was released. But HBO Max isn't exactly just an update. It is a whole new business model with a new privacy policy and an upcoming ad-supported tier. Those are massive changes to what exactly HBO stream is which needs to conform with Roku's policies just the same as they needed to conform to the Google Play store policies.

I will completely agree to you that a mere update to the HBO app should not be blocked. When such a mere update to the app is made available from HBO without all of the other things but still blocked by Roku then let me know.


@j_m_ wrote:

@fluke wrote:

I do completely understand that Roku is not identical to Comcast.  For example, the AG for the state of Washington's court action seeking $100 million for violating the state Consumer Protection Act only applied to Comcast and never has been issued against Roku.  But for purposes of being a premium channel reseller, they are similar.

They are not. But they think they are and, with the help of folks like you, they are trying to convince folks of that. And it is working on a lot of the “Roku can do no wrong folks” in this thread (some of whom are likely employees).

I don't think Roku can do no wrong. They have done plenty wrong. I don't think Roku expecting to be the treated the same as Google is wrong.  To stay in business, Roku needs to be able to compete.


@j_m_ wrote:

@fluke wrote:

By the way, how is Comcast's infrastructure such a great expense in comparison to telecoms in other countries that can deliver the same internet speed for between half to a fifth the price?  I think Comcast is already fairly reimbursed.

I am not going to defend Comcast (or USA providers in general) on Internet pricing, speed, availability, etc. compared to other comparable countries. Many of us ate with them because they are the inly good option—that is a whole other issue where I definitely blame Comcast. But that is not this. I doubt Roku has any infrastructure other than what exists in their offices and server room. So, no, not the same. Without Comcast and other ISPs’ infrastructure, Roku cannot exist.

I think Roku could exist fine without Comcast. While it is true Roku can not exist without ISPs, I am not sure that Comcast, voted Worst Company in America, has done the best job in that regard.


@j_m_ wrote:

@fluke wrote:

Based on your logic, if I use an Xfinity login to get access to HBO but only ever access it from a separate cell phone service or a separate internet connection provided by an employer or friend then Comcast is not entitled to any data about me. That just isn't how reality works. The data that Comcasts gets related to HBO subscribers is independent of which network infrastructure is used to access the HBO content.

That is not my logic at all. Comcast gets my subscriber data because I pay them for cable HBO it can only sell because AT&T needs them to deliver HBO over Comcast cable infrastructure. AT&T does not deliver HBO Max over Roku infrastructure Roku does not host the stream or own the wiring infrastructure to my home). Roku makes a device on which an app provider such as AT&T should be (and used to be) able to make available the app that AT&T wrote that delivers HBO’s content from HBO servers somewhere through Comcast/Other ISP/Internet to their subscribers. If they want to do that directly as do other apps, not through the Roku Channel, then they should not be blocked by Roku, which is what I believe is happening.

Your argument against reselling under aggregation goes against HBO Max as well.

You can sign up for HBO Max without going through a cable provider. None of that $14.99 goes toward the infrastructure required for HBO Max to deliver the content anymore than payments to Roku Channels does.

But HBO Max still very much does aggregation of content it didn't fund the creation of, take a look at some of the top movies provided by them right now:

(1) The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, owned by Studio Ghibili and aggregated by HBO Max

(2) Citizen Kane, created by Mercury Productions and aggregated by HBO Max

(3) Singin' in the Rain, owned by MGM and aggregated by HBO Max

Aggregation of content from others without owning infrastructure is how the world works today.  For the USA companies that are providing that infrastructure, they are more than fairly compensated when compared to other telecom companies around the world.

 


@j_m_ wrote:
Imagine if you could not install software on a Windows PC without first getting Microsoft’s approval or the software author paying Microsoft. I guess many folks are okay with that. I’m not.

I don't have to imagine it, that exists... it is called Windows 10 in S mode. All apps must be signed by the Windows Appstore to be permitted to run for any product with Windows 10 in S mode installed.


@j_m_ wrote:

@fluke wrote:

However, when recommending a non-supported side-loaded "solution" to others, it should come with the caveats clearly spelled out. No one should be paying $120 for an overpriced fire cube expecting it will deliver the best HBO Max experience. The side-loading work-around will play just the same on the $40 stick for now and may break in the future either way.  And neither will keep the keep the app up to date similar to how Roku automatically keeps apps up to date (or how Google Play does).

Not sure who recommended a Fire Cube. I don’t. You can regularly get the 4k Stick for $25-30. Maybe Amazon disables sideloading capability in the future, maybe not—very few Android devices do. If they do, another Android TV device will allow it. Unlike Roku, Android is open, uses standard programming languages, and as a result has a lot of developer support (professional and otherwise). And, unlike Roku, it works with HBO Max now and is based on an OS that will likely continue to get better as Android steadily has over the years while Roku clings to the same, dated UI, likely limited by the proprietary scripting language it created for digital signs.

I’m not wasting any more breath or time on you. You keep on blindly defending Roku though. I know you will.


 

Ok then.

However, I am fine with you stating that other devices are the ones that will provide access to HBO Max right now. I'm just pointing out flaws in what you are saying. If someone wants to promote Chromecast, that is fine but keep in mine that Google is forcing similar requirements on HBO Max that Roku is asking for. If someone wants to promote side-loading an APK, that is also fine but keep in mind we only have access to that APK because someone mirrored it from the Google Play store--and again, Google is forcing similar requirements on HBO Max.

Please just keep in mind that what you are recommending isn't an escape from having appstore style rules. It is just more of the same.

If you want to be able to run any app at all without any appstore review, Roku actually provides this. The developer options for Roku allows a side-loaded app to be installed and run (but only one at a time). If HBO wanted to abuse this option, they could. It is HBO that refused to release HBO Max to Roku app for access to users that enabled developer mode. AT&T/TW/HBO wants to provide the app only through the Roku appstore while also being able to dictate exceptions to the appstore rules. That isn't how the world works.

Also, my stating how reality works for appstores (Apple Appstore, Google Play, Roku, etc) does not defend the concepts of the appstores, just is merely a statement on that being how things work. You rather have access to HBO Max without the positives and negatives of appstore review, feel free to ask HBO why they haven't given you access to the Roku app to side-load yet.

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MoviesProbably
Level 10

Re: HBO Max can be accessed on your ROKU on Hulu

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@fluke

Your argument against reselling under aggregation goes against HBO Max as well.

You can sign up for HBO Max without going through a cable provider. None of that $14.99 goes toward the infrastructure required for HBO Max to deliver the content anymore than payments to Roku Channels does.

But HBO Max still very much does aggregation of content it didn't fund the creation of, take a look at some of the top movies provided by them right now:

(1) The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, owned by Studio Ghibili and aggregated by HBO Max

(2) Citizen Kane, created by Mercury Productions and aggregated by HBO Max

(3) Singin' in the Rain, owned by MGM and aggregated by HBO Max

Aggregation of content from others without owning infrastructure is how the world works today.  For the USA companies that are providing that infrastructure, they are more than fairly compensated when compared to other telecom companies around the world.


Singin' in the Rain's home video rights are owned by Warner Brothers, parent company of HBO and now owned by AT&T, and have been for 30 years. Warners owns the video rights to most pre-1986 MGM movies and old RKO films like Citizen Kane as well. Mercury dissolved in 1946. Warners has done all of the digital restoration of these films. Most of the non-HBO television content on HBO Max, including Friends and Big Bang Theory, were originally produced by Warner Brothers Television.

Aggregating licensed content into a single streaming service that people can choose to buy or not to buy is different than a hardware producer and wannabe content gatekeeper shaking down content creators for access to millions of users and if they don't capitulate the users can't choose to use their service at all unless they buy different hardware. AT&T handles all of HBO's streaming infrastructure, Roku doesn't take on any of that expense. They provide hardware and now content gatekeeping. That's it. 

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