Channel Issues & Questions

Help & troubleshooting for channels on your Roku device, including adding/removing channels, logging in to, authenticating, or activating a channel, channel-specific playback issues, assistance contacting channel publishers to report issues, and adjusting channel-specific settings.
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Level 12

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

People are slow to wake up and start asking questions.  Then making demands.  If they don't get what THEY want, most elect to choose to "disappear" and defect to devices that have what they want.  Some with lots of noise and fanfare.  Most do a quiet vanishing act.  All discover  for themselves at present an new and/or obscure app or 2 (at present HBO Max & Peacock TV). 

More people do the same. Then select and defect accordanly.  It/they becomes popular.  Perhaps just as much as Netflix and Hulu.  Then Netflix. Hulu, Roku, and the former "in" apps and devices join Netscape, MySpace, DivX & the rest of the failed Internet startups in obscurity or even the graveyard.

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Level 21

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

Users are expecting there to be one single device that can stream "everything". No such player exists, unfortunately. There are things that each brand of device cannot do, and that's simply the current state of streaming media players. The Android boxes come the closest, with the Nvidia Shield being the top dog there. But it too has limitations, such as no HDR from YouTube. But it's why many of us have more than one streaming device, along with the various "smart" TV apps. 

Perhaps some day the mythical box that does it all will appear, but I have my doubts. 

Dan
Roku Stick (3600), Ultra (4640), Ultra (4670), Premiere (3920), Insignia 720p Roku TV, Sharp 4K Roku TV, Nvidia Shield, Windows 10 Pro x64 running Serviio and Plex on a wired Gigabit network.
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Level 12

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

I generally agree.  I still like the simplicity of the Roku OS.  I had a Gen 2 Chromecast for the browser based content to toss on a large screen if needed.  

I identified what the users are really are upset at.  Lack of real control over the apps appearing on their Home Screens.  Being completely ignored by Roku.  Additional unexpected stress caused by another problem present in all people's lives, the pandemic and an unknown whatever Covid 19 is.  

Streamers moved from cable substitute or a tinkering hobby to serious lockdown diversion activity for the masses. Is all these involved big corporations taking advantage of these captive audiences?  Sure.  Just look at how the masses are treated!

The easy money and captive audiences will not last forever any more than disease does.  And most people will remember.

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Level 8

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

Hello bknabe --Wanted to compliment you on this reply from earlier.  I think it is your best point agreed on, even if not totally predictive. 

For Roku it appears that the sticking point is that HBO is rolling out an ad supported version in the near future, but ROKU wants a few commercial spots per hour for themselves which has been customary with all of the other AVOD apps on ROKU. If Comcast and AT&T get their way the streaming world will wither away to a handful of giant players that will feed us their thin gruel of garbage content that will harken back to the pre-streaming days of network prime time and a few Pay TV schlock factories. ROKU needs to hold the fort."

"This is what I've been trying to tell people from the beginning. But everyone has to have it now, who cares what it means later."

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Level 8

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible


@Iona-D wrote:

People are slow to wake up and start asking questions.  Then making demands.  If they don't get what THEY want, most elect to choose to "disappear" and defect to devices that have what they want.  Some with lots of noise and fanfare.  Most do a quiet vanishing act.  All discover  for themselves at present an new and/or obscure app or 2 (at present HBO Max & Peacock TV). 

More people do the same. Then select and defect accordanly.  It/they becomes popular.  Perhaps just as much as Netflix and Hulu.  Then Netflix. Hulu, Roku, and the former "in" apps and devices join Netscape, MySpace, DivX & the rest of the failed Internet startups in obscurity or even the graveyard.


So now HBO and NBC-Universal are obscure?  Come on now.

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Level 8

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

"You are underestimating the damage being done to the Roku brand.  People are dumping Roku devices to buy other devices so that they can get HBO Max and Peacock. You need to look at the soccer forums/threads now that the English Premier League season has started and NBC has put most of the games on Peacock.  Roku is quickly becoming a dirty word in those circles.  This is beyond ridiculous already."

Exactly!

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Level 9

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

HBO Max and Peacock apps are still obscure. They are not popular like Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, etc. Their subscriber take rate is low, below forecast. 
Iona had a good point. Roku taking a risk that defections could occur if they are no longer obscure apps. 

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Level 9

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible

I agree it is ridiculous and needs to be settled. I understand the risk but you are overplaying the demand for HBOMax and Peacock (at this point). If soccer fans want to be pissed, they should contact ATT and Comcast for failing to have their app on Roku and FireTV.
You seem to be focused on blaming Roku ($1 billion ann rev) versus ATT ($180B ann) or Comcast ($110B ann), when Roku’s focus is to generate rev to stay in business. 

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Level 9

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible


@PhxCoronado wrote:


You seem to be focused on blaming Roku ($1 billion ann rev) versus ATT ($180B ann) or Comcast ($110B ann), when Roku’s focus is to generate rev to stay in business. 


I keep noticing that, particularly from Iona-D.

Makes me wonder why she(?) is so determined for people to ditch their Rokus, especially for AT&T/Time Warner -- smells a bit of sockpuppetry.

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Level 9

Re: First HBO Max, Now Peacock... Roku needs to be more flexible


@PhxCoronado wrote:

HBO Max and Peacock apps are still obscure. They are not popular like Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, etc. Their subscriber take rate is low, below forecast. 


HBO is big on cable, but on streaming? They're a hash of apps that confuse people:

  • Do you want HBO Now or HBO Go if you want to watch this year's revisionist PERRY MASON series, or re-watch DEADWOOD or GAME OF THRONES?
  • Why are you paying so much for one, when the other's free if you have a cable package already? 
  • WTF is HBO Max, why isn't it on my box if it's such a big deal, and where's it's "Heroin Content" (content you just got to have, no matter what)? Shows that might qualify, like WATCHMEN, LOVECRAFT COUNTRY, or the aforementioned PERRY MASON, are readily available as a part of HBO on Roku.

Little as Iona-D (or her? corporate masters) may like it, more people are likely to give up on HBO Max than to give up on Roku. HBO Max's rollout was such a disaster that the man in charge of that got his ass fired over it: Not on two of the biggest streaming aggregators (and both Roku and Amazon Fire Stick are big, especially next to Android TV or Tizen!); nobody knows WTF HBO Max is or how it's different than other streaming HBO platforms; and whether or not you have to pay for it is a minefield of corporate overreach. 

As for Peacock? Its rollout was more of a joke than AppleTV+'s was: It's got no content to distinguish it from DVR'ing NBC shows; like HBO Max it premiere'd on neither of the biggest streaming aggregators -- yes, I know they're both on AppleTV, but outside of hardcore Apple fans nobody's going to pay for either the "Apple Tax" or its "Walled Garden" approach to streaming when both Roku and Amazon are offering much cheaper and more comprehensive alternatives; and its tiered pricing plan, which should have been its biggest virtue, was so badly marketed most people think it's all a free service.